viscountess


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viscountess

1. the wife or widow of a viscount
2. a woman who holds the rank of viscount in her own right
References in periodicals archive ?
During this period Helen Gibbons married Richard, Lord Long, and became the Viscountess Long.
The former jockey and Channel 4 pundit was questioned on Thursday after Katya Pilkington - whose one sister is Claudia, Viscountess Rothermere, and another is married to Sir Mark Thatcher - called the police.
The three-part series, called All Change At Longleat, follows the Viscount and Viscountess of Weymouth as they look after the day-to-day running of Longleat Safari Park in Wiltshire.
Exploring how people in Antiquity kept public memories, archaeologists and Egyptologists discuss whether the ancient Egyptian scene of Pharaoh smiting his enemies was an attempt to visualize cultural memory, cultural memory and the reading of inscribed epigram in classical Athens, becoming Roman in Varro's de Lingua Latina, Philo and Josephus on dreams as examples of Jewish memory and identity in the first century AD, Pausanias' Egypt, forgetting to remember in the Dakhleh Oasis in Egypt, and the monument to Viscountess Harriet Fitzharris.
Three years later, the couple became Viscount and Viscountess Cobham on the death of her father-in-law.
Question four: The Viscountess Furness Cup was last won by the Platers from Haverton Hill in 1968, the cup then went national under what name?
He starts off in Northern Ireland at the Colebrooke Park home of Viscount and Viscountess Brookeborough.
Bridesmaids include Lady Louise Windsor, who is the daughter of the Earl and Countess of Wessex and is William's cousin, and the Hon Margarita Armstrong-Jones, who is the daughter of Viscount and Viscountess Linley.
Illustrations include examples of Woodman's works and those of women photography predecessors Julia Margaret Cameron and Clementina, Viscountess Hawarden.
When Hannah finds a letter addressed to her mother as a viscountess, she discovers more about her missing father's family than she had previously been told.
Born to nobility, Eleanor of Aquitaine's (1122-1204) parents were William X, duke of Aquitaine, and Aenor, daughter of Dangerosa, the viscountess of Chatellerault.
She was Secretary of the International Federation of University Women between 1920-1935 and worked with Viscountess Rhondda as Literary Editor of Time and Tide.