viscountess


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viscountess

1. the wife or widow of a viscount
2. a woman who holds the rank of viscount in her own right
References in periodicals archive ?
Viscountess Weymouth runs Longleat safari park with her family.
"During this period Helen Gibbons married Richard, Lord Long, and became the Viscountess Long.
I can't wait for the dancing and the fabulous outfits!" - Viscountess Emma Weymouth is the eighth celebrity contestant confirmed for the new series of Strictly
The former jockey and Channel 4 pundit was questioned on Thursday after Katya Pilkington - whose one sister is Claudia, Viscountess Rothermere, and another is married to Sir Mark Thatcher - called the police.
The three-part series, called All Change At Longleat, follows the Viscount and Viscountess of Weymouth as they look after the day-to-day running of Longleat Safari Park in Wiltshire.
"You can't buy the kind of prestige that comes with a Visit England award", said SVR assistant visitor services manager Lisa Smith, after the railway received its accolade from Visit England chairman, Penelope, Viscountess Cobham, and David Hodgkinson, sales director of Barclaycard, which sponsored the award.
They also know I'm going to ask them to do things which they may not feel they have the ability to do, so they do kick back sometimes, but that's part of the process." HOUSE C4, Thursday, 8pm The first owners to benefit from his expertise are Viscount and Viscountess Brookeborough of Colebrooke Park, County Fermanagh, which they rescued near ruin.
Question seven: In which year did construction begin on the Question eight: Princess Mary, Viscountess Lascalles opened which Teesside promenade on August 10 1926?
VisitEngland chairman Viscountess Cobham said: "At well over 100 years old, this veritable institution has evolved to suit the time.
Nancy, Viscountess Astor, was elected as the Coalition Unionist member for the Sutton constituency of Plymouth.
MURPHY was infuriated like every other Irish person when Viscountess Serena Linley, right, described Ireland as "the bog".