viscous drag

viscous drag

[′vis·kəs ′drag]
(fluid mechanics)
That part of the rearward force on an aircraft that results from the aircraft carrying air forward with it through viscous adherence.
References in periodicals archive ?
When the clutch pack is open, the plates shear ATF for viscous drag, resulting in energy losses having a negative effect on fuel efficiency.
Unlike some other work in which particles agglomerate due to the interaction between acoustic radiation forces, fluid drag, buoyancy and gravity forces within an horizontal ultrasonic standing wave field [7], particles in our model are subject only to viscous drag force generated due to the relative motion between the flow and the particles [8], and the flow oscillations are caused by the noise emitted from rotational machines, such as ICE, instead of external sound sources.
The modern maxis like Comanche and Rambler have huge wetted surface so when they are not heeled, you're carrying a lot of viscous drag around with you."
The conditions for turbulent flow are met when the inertia effect of the fluid flow overcomes the viscous drag; the ratio of the former to the latter is defined as the Reynolds number.
Thickness of the polymer film on the substrate depended on the viscous drag holding polymer solution on the substrate during drawing the substrate at a given velocity upwards from the tank against the gravity draining of the solution and, in addition, evaporation of the solvent [16].
If the tread rubber cannot penetrate the ice/liquid film to make contact with the solid ice underneath, the source of friction is not adhesion or deformation hysteresis (as for dry conditions), but rather comes from viscous drag of the tread rubber on this liquid film.
and [F.sub.L] is a viscous drag. We presume that the velocity of the ball is relatively low and we can use Stokes's law to determine the resistance of the fluid:
The torque, generally measured by determining the reaction torque on the motor, is proportional to the viscous drag on the spindle, and thus to the viscosity of the fluid.Significantly, the rotational viscometer can run throughout the mixing process, logging data constantly to provide a log of the change in viscosity over time.
After knowing the velocity field, it is very important from a physical point of view to know the effect of viscoelastic parameter on resistive force or viscous drag. The resistive force or viscous drag on the surface of the body due to the motion of the fluid is known as the shearing stress.
It was realized that the injection tends to raise the boundary layer thickness, to postpone its separation and to reduce the viscous drag produced.