Visé

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Related to vise: vice, Viser

Visé

(vēzā`), commune (1991 pop. 17,019), Liège prov., E Belgium, on the Meuse River and on the Albert Canal, near the Dutch border. It is a center of cement manufacture. The first battle of World War I was fought there on Aug. 4, 1914. After a fire the same year, the town was rebuilt. It is also known as Wezet.

Vise

 

a device designed to hold a workpiece in a suitable position. Vises consist of a body and two gripping jaws and are designed as machine (metalworking) or bench units.

Machine vises are mounted on metal-cutting machine tools for use in milling, drilling, planing, and other machining operations. Bench vises are mounted on workbenches and are used in various kinds of fitting operations. Anvil vises, for example, are used in chopping, straightening, and other types of fabrication in which the workpiece is struck. The jaws of parallel vises, both swiveling and nonswiveling types, are not as strong as those of other types; such vises are used in more complex and precise operations that do not involve striking the workpiece. Hand vises hold small workpieces for drilling, filing, and similar operations in cases where holding the workpiece in the hand would be inconvenient or dangerous. Specialized vises are available for specific metal-working applications, for example, vises with jaws bent back for use in chamfering.

In most vises, a screw handle must be turned in order to bring the jaws together to grip the workpiece. Wedges, diaphragms, cams, and other mechanisms are also used. Pneumatic parallel vises use compressed air to move and tighten the adjustable jaws. The size of a vise is determined by the width and maximum separation of the jaws. In anvil vises, these dimensions range to 180 and 200 mm, respectively; in parallel vises, to 140 and 180 mm; and in hand vises, to 15–45 and 15–4) mm.

N. A. SHCHEMELEV

vise

[vīs]
(design engineering)
A tool consisting of two jaws for holding a workpiece; opened and closed by a screw, lever, or cam mechanism.

vis, vice, vise

A spiral staircase generally of stone, whose steps wind around a central shaft or newel; a screw stair.

vise

vise, 1
1. A gripping tool, fixed or portable, used to hold an object firmly while work is performed on it; has movable jaws, similar to a clamp, which are brought together by a screw or lever.
2. SeeVis.

vice

2 (US (often)), vise
an appliance for holding an object while work is done upon it, usually having a pair of jaws
References in periodicals archive ?
Never clamp a receiver in a vise without some type of fixture, otherwise you run the risk of damaging it.
I also have a Shop Fox compound drill press vise with 3 1/8" smooth jaws mounted on my number two drill press.
To achieve the smoothest finish possible and approximate the ground surfaces of the CNC vise, Sun says he selected the Dot style brush and intentionally reduced the spindle speed.
Skip one hole in the front left corner, where it would interfere with the vise.
Anybody who has worked on cars, bikes, lawnmowers and the like will know how much holding force a vise can exert.
* The XL vises have durable 80,000 PSI ductile iron bodies with precision machined steel components.
An L-shaped version would bring the vise up to a better working height, but that would take up more space, and I'm planning to use it only when working away from the shop.
Showgoers will test the product in a "quick-change challenge" that pits four participants at a time in a race to see who can take the vise through five different changeovers, and prizes are to be awarded.
* An angle vise can be adjusted to a flat position and used as a regular vise.
Zwick has also addressed the issue of the Izod vise's clamping force, which can influence test results.
BallLock base production vises are intended to provide quick-change fixturing solutions in two ways: Jaw changeovers take less than a minute and the BallLock mounting system built in the vise's base permits one-minute changeover of vises.
But what he's really nuts for is the lowly vise. "It's an obsession for me," he says, readily admitting that he has little competition.