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Related to visual axis: fovea, pupillary axis

Axis,

coalition of countries headed by Germany, Italy, and Japan, 1936–45 (see World War IIWorld War II,
1939–45, worldwide conflict involving every major power in the world. The two sides were generally known as the Allies and the Axis. Causes and Outbreak
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). The expression "Rome-Berlin axis" originated in Oct., 1936, with an accord reached by HitlerHitler, Adolf
, 1889–1945, founder and leader of National Socialism (Nazism), and German dictator, b. Braunau in Upper Austria. Early Life

The son of Alois Hitler (1837–1903), an Austrian customs official, Adolf Hitler dropped out of high school, and
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 and MussoliniMussolini, Benito
, 1883–1945, Italian dictator and leader of the Fascist movement. Early Career

His father, an ardent Socialist, was a blacksmith; his mother was a teacher.
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. The Axis was solidified by an Italo-German alliance in May, 1939. This was extended (Sept., 1940) by a military alliance among Germany, Italy, and Japan—the so-called Berlin Pact, to which Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, Slovakia, and Croatia adhered later. The related Anti-Comintern Pact (see CominternComintern
[acronym for Communist International], name given to the Third International, founded at Moscow in 1919. Vladimir Ilyich Lenin feared a resurgence of the Second, or Socialist, International under non-Communist leadership.
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), originally concluded between Germany and Japan in 1936, later had as adherents, besides the Berlin Pact nations, Spain, Denmark, Finland, and the puppet governments of Manchukuo and Nanjing.

axis

1. An imaginary line that usually passes through the center of a body or system and about which the body is often symmetrical or has some form of symmetry. It is the imaginary line about which a rotating body turns or about which an object, such as the celestial sphere, appears to rotate.
2. A reference line on a graph.

Axis

An imaginary straight line, about which parts of a building, or group of buildings, can be arranged or measured.

axis

[′ak·səs]
(anatomy)
The second cervical vertebra in higher vertebrates; the first vertebra of amphibians.
The center line of an organism, organ, or other body part.
(geology)
A line where a folded bed has maximum curvature.
The central portion of a mountain chain.
(graphic arts)
The locus of intersection of two pencils of lines in perspective position.
(mathematics)
In a coordinate system, the line determining one of the coordinates, obtained by setting all other coordinates to zero.
A line of symmetry for a geometric figure.
For a cone whose base has a center, a line passing through this center and the vertex of the cone.
(mechanics)
A line about which a body rotates.

axis

A straight line indicating center of symmetry of a solid or plane figure.

Axis

in World War II, the affiance of Germany, Italy, Japan, etc., opposing the Allies. [Eur. Hist.: Collier’s, VIII, 457]

axis

1
1. a real or imaginary line about which a body, such as an aircraft, can rotate or about which an object, form, composition, or geometrical construction is symmetrical
2. one of two or three reference lines used in coordinate geometry to locate a point in a plane or in space
3. Anatomy the second cervical vertebra
4. Botany the main central part of a plant, typically consisting of the stem and root, from which secondary branches and other parts develop
5. an alliance between a number of states to coordinate their foreign policy
6. Optics the line of symmetry of an optical system, such as the line passing through the centre of a lens
7. Geology an imaginary line along the crest of an anticline or the trough of a syncline
8. Crystallog one of three lines passing through the centre of a crystal and used to characterize its symmetry

axis

2
any of several S Asian deer of the genus Axis, esp A. axis. They typically have a reddish-brown white-spotted coat and slender antlers
References in periodicals archive ?
Image B does not represent a normal eyelid position, but an eyelid elevated above the visual axis.
The latter is based on data suggesting that the alignment of the transducer, needle and screen in the same parallel plane and visual axis, improves of visualization and needle advancement accuracy, which is key to a successful nerve block.
97 Visual axis Total Visual Visual from visual axis from axis from sagittal Eye angle physical axis frontal plane plane AM 93[degrees] 8[degrees] right 0[degrees] 9[degrees] of right eye AL 32[degrees] 6[degrees] right 33[degrees] 20[degrees] of right eye ventral PM 37[degrees] 19[degrees] right 38[degrees] 33[degrees] of right eye dorsal PL 24[degrees] 1[degrees] right 44[degrees] 90[degrees] of right eye dorsal
Construct a sculpture by arranging smaller forms around the visual axis in different positions so that their combined "weight" equals that of larger masses, thus creating the feeling of.
This takes place preferably before vision-reducing morphological changes in the visual axis develop.
13 Clinically it progresses and migrates from periphery over the limbus towards center usually on nasal side leading to ocular irritation and decreased vision secondary to obscuration of visual axis and induced astigmatism.
Superior incision has twice the astigmatic impact of temporal incision due to the fact that temporal limbus is further away from the visual axis than superior limbus.
Once the pterygium had been excised from the corneal surface, there was a significant subjective improvement in visual acuity, mainly due to a decrease in astigmatism and removal of pterygium from visual axis specially in Grade-II and III lesions (p less than 0.
Interface debris may be noted following LASIK/LASEK; this does not usually cause any problems unless it is on the visual axis although it may stimulate epithelial ingrowth later on.
The resultant abnormally-proliferative remnant LECs migrate to the posterior capsule, where they approach the central visual axis and cause visual-axis obscuration, resulting in diminution of vision which had been previously improved post cataract surgery.

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