vital actions

vital actions

Actions that must be carried out in the interest of safety and proper aircraft operation. These may either be specific to the type of aircraft (more often than not) or a part of general airmanship. The most common vital actions occur before takeoff and during the downwind leg in the traffic pattern.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
However, even though some fertility problems are not preventable, there are certain vital actions one can take to help initiate new beginnings.
(23) As stated in (a), the soul's greater nobility enables it to be a principle of more perfect actions, namely the so called vital actions. (24) At the beginning of his commentary on Aristotle's De anima, Suarez describes these actions as those "that must not only be received in the acting being itself, but also must be carried out by the intrinsic principle of the agent." (25) This description sounds as if vital actions were just the same as immanent actions.
This twofold meaning of immanence results in a problem when trying to identify immanence with life, (28) just as the initial description of vital actions suggested.
Before tackling the problem of the difference between immanent and Vital actions, it is important to examine another distinction, namely that between immanent action and immanent act.
Too much resources to improve the rest amounts to "busy work" and in some cases causes harm due to vital actions being lost or impeded.
On a regular basis, the force-shaping staff tells people to perform several vital actions.
Green Howards CSM Stan Hollis was the only soldier to win a VC for vital actions on D-Day.
Critically, the demonstration included two vital actions such as unclipping and removing the lid and one superfluous action such as tapping the top of the box twice.