vitamin K


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Related to vitamin K: vitamin E, vitamin D, Vitamin K Deficiency

vitamin K

[′vīd·ə·mən ¦kā]
(biochemistry)
Any of three yellowish oils which are fat-soluble, nonsteroid, and nonsaponifiable; it is essential for formation of prothrombin. Also known as antihemorrhagic vitamin; prothrombin factor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vitamin K is capable of opposing many of the leading causes of death in modern-day Americans--including atherosclerosis, (3) osteoporosis, (4) diabetes, (5,6) and cancer (2,7)--because it has the unique ability to activate proteins involved in these conditions.
In this article, we will review a host of new studies that detail the impact of vitamin K supplementation on preventing these and other major age-related diseases.
director of the Vitamin K Laboratory at Tufts' Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging in Boston.
Not much is known about the amount of vitamin K we need; the current recommendations for adequate amounts simply reflect the average American intakes--90 micrograms of K daily for women; 120 for men.
Its attraction to calcium helps vitamin K form strong bones.
The jury's still out on the safety of high amounts of vitamin K.
According to a study that appeared in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 1999, Vitamin K is needed to make a protein that's essential for bone formation.
Each Viactiv Soft Calcium Chew, for example, supplies not only 500 milligrams of calcium, but 40 micrograms (half a day's worth) of vitamin K.
She and her colleagues estimated vitamin K intake from 14-day food intake diaries of a nationwide sample of about 2,000 households.
Since vitamin K lies at the heart of blood coagulation, which heals injuries but also causes heart attacks and strokes," Dowd says, "the key question is: How can someone preserve the blood's injury-healing abilities yet stop unwanted internal clots?
Lab studies demonstrate tremendous potential for vitamin K in many other cancer types as well.
Vitamin K is required to make the active form of the bone protein called osteocalcin.