vitriolic


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vitriolic

(of a substance, esp a strong acid) highly corrosive
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, her vitriolic and dismissive comments on the works by Duato and Webre in the Washington program came as no surprise.
Similarly, Gakwandi's endorsement of the Bakhtinian notion of the carnivalesque in an otherwise erudite and scholarly contribution is problematized by Nwankwo's vitriolic dismissal of Richard Wright.
Former CIA employee Mark Tooley, hired by the right-wing Institute on Religion and Democracy to attack the United Methodist Church's social agenda, launched a vitriolic charge against that church in a 1996 mailing to thousands of its members.
Gager's published poems deal with public issues like the assassination attempts on Elizabeth in 1584 and 1586, for which he wrote odes of thankful deliverance and vitriolic attacks on the would-be assassins; Sidney's death in 1587; the death of the Queen in 1603; the visit to Oxford in 1613 of Prince Charles and Frederick the Elector Palatine, before his marriage to Charles's sister Elizabeth; and the like (III.6 ff.).
Under the editorship of Mencken, the periodical fast gained a reputation for Mencken's vitriolic articles directed at the American public (the "booboisie") and for Nathan's excellent theatrical criticism.
Secure from political and religious interference at Ferney, because of its geographical location, Voltaire poured forth innumerable vitriolic pamphlets attacking just about everyone who disagreed with him.
Fitzmaurice and his players had been on the end of vitriolic abuse from a section of the fans.
Talking to party workers here on Tuesday, she said that Altaf was speaking Modi's language, adding that no words were enough to condemn the vitriolic speech by Altaf Hussain.
Their vitriolic outpourings of blame are both offensive and unnecessary.
On Saturday, he used vitriolic against Rangers and military stating that they were cowards.
"Women really need to examine why they are so vitriolic towards other women - why they want to twist words, why they want to read about someone else in a negative light and why that feels good to them" - Actress Gwyneth Paltrow (pictured).
I was amused by David Kite's assessment of my article as being 'vitriolic' and a 'personal vendetta'.