Viviparous Lizard

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Viviparous Lizard

 

(Lacerta viviparta), a reptile of the family Lacertidae. Body length, 15 to 18 cm; tail length, 10 to 11 cm. Its dorsal coloration is brown with black spots. The males have an orange abdomen; females have green or yellow abdomens. The viviparous lizard, distributed throughout Europe (except in the southeast) and northern Asia, is found on mountains up to 3,000 m in elevation. It lives primarily in hummocky swamps with shrubs and in coniferous and deciduous forests and feeds on insects, spiders, and other small invertebrates.

The fertilized eggs remain in the oviducts, where their development takes approximately three months. The young usually emerge from the mother still in the eggshells, hatching within several minutes (this method of reproduction is called ovoviviparity). The young measure up to 4 cm long and are black. The litter of older females consists of eight to 12 off-spring; young females bear two to five. Viviparous lizards winter in burrows, under tree roots, or under bark. Ovoviviparity developed in this species as a result of the cold continental climate. In the Pyrenees Mountains, however, the viviparous lizard is an egg-layer.

References in periodicals archive ?
Reproductive activity of three sympatric viviparous lizards at Omiltemi, Guerrero, Sierra Mache del Sur, Mexico.
As a consequence, if global warming continues at the same rate, viviparous lizards are facing extinction in the next few decades.
grandis, consistent with other fall/winter active viviparous lizards (Goldberg 1971; 2002; Smith et al.
Asynchronous spermatogenesis and biennial female cycle of the viviparous lizard Phymaturus antofagastensis (Liolaemidae): reproductive responses to high altitudes and temperate climate of Catamarca, Argentina.
Viviparous lizards in lower latitudes show patterns characterized by gametogenesis, courtship, and mating in fall, gestation over winter, and birth of the offspring during the following spring (Guillette and Casas-Andreu, 1980; Mendez et al.
Differential atresia of ovarian follicles and its effect on the clutch size of two populations of the viviparous lizard Sceloporus mucronatus.
The reproductive cycle of Barisia monticola: a unique variation among viviparous lizards.
The Sceloporus grammicus species complex currently includes at least three species of small, viviparous lizards, whose ranges collectively encompass most of Mexico: S.
Other viviparous lizards can substantially modify the phenotypes, including body mass, of their offspring during gestation (Shine and Downes, 1999).
2002) species, while seasonal cycles are represented by reproduction in viviparous lizards in autumn (Guillette and Mendez-de la Cruz, 1993; Mendez-de la Cruz et al.
In other viviparous lizards, pregnant females often maintain their body temperature at different levels than non-pregnant females (e.
dugesii have asynchronous testicular and ovarian cycles, suggestion that mating may occur prior to ovulation, as in other viviparous lizards of the families Scincidae (Guillette, 1993; Ramirez-Bautista et al.