tract

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tract

1
1. Anatomy a system of organs, glands, or other tissues that has a particular function
2. a bundle of nerve fibres having the same function, origin, and termination

tract

2
RC Church an anthem in some Masses

Tract

 

in the central nervous system, any one of several groups of closely placed nerve fibers having a common morphological structure and common functions. Tracts are divided by function into associative tracts, which unite various sections of the cerebral cortex in the same hemisphere; commisural tracts, which connect both hemispheres and ensure their cooperative activity; and projection tracts, which unite the cerebral cortex with lower brain formations and, through them, with the periphery.

References in periodicals archive ?
Next, air flow is modified by a series of structures that constitute the vocal tract. Finally, the modified flow is radiated through the lips and nostrils.
Regarding the vocal tract symptoms monthly frequency analyzed daily, it was observed higher occurrence of voice symptoms in the period without the dynamic soundfield system use.
High-speed registration of phonation-related glottal area variation during artificial lengthening of the vocal tract. Logop Phoniatr Vocol.
The calls were distinguished between one another by their "formants," a term that is usually applied to the vocal tract resonance that makes one human voice sound different from another.
Some researchers regard hyoid shape in humans as an indicator of a vocal tract designed for speaking.
Titze, "How to Use Flow-Resistant Straws," Journal of Singing 58, no.5 (May/June, 2002): 429; Marco Guzman, Anne-Maria Laukkanen, Petra Krupa, et al., "Vocal Tract and Glottal Function During and After Vocal Exercising with Resonance Tube and Straw," Journal of Voice 27, no.
"However, in a helium-enriched atmosphere the tuning of the vocal cord vibration and the resonance of the vocal tract are altered as the gas causes an upward shift of the resonance frequencies," he said
sapiens--possessed a short set of neck vertebrae, resulting in a vocal tract with a restricted range of speech sounds, McCarthy and his coworkers argue.
For vowels such as /a/ and /ae/ in the pitch range of [G.sub.4] to [E.sub.5] (396-660 Hz), the second harmonic [2f.sub.o] is dominant due to its proximity to the first resonance of the vocal tract. (Note: For this discussion, resonance frequencies of the vocal tract will be equated with formant frequencies, even though measured formant frequencies are sometimes only approximations of resonance frequencies.)
The voice's resonant frequency through the vocal tract can be picked up via desktop microphone headsets and measured, allowing employers to tell in real time when their workers' brains are being overtaxed and, if necessary, intervene to avert disaster.
Bozeman explains the anatomic and acoustic principles that are the basis for pedagogic directives such as "inhale through a smile" or "inhale as if smelling a rose." He also presents the "two-room metaphor," an image he devised to help singers achieve ideal resonator shapes in the vocal tract. Bozeman devotes a chapter to explaining this perception.