voluntary

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voluntary

1. Law
a. acting or done without legal obligation, compulsion, or persuasion
b. made without payment or recompense in any form
2. (of the muscles of the limbs, neck, etc.) having their action controlled by the will
3. maintained or provided by the voluntary actions or contributions of individuals and not by the state
4. Music a composition or improvisation, usually for organ, played at the beginning or end of a church service
References in periodicals archive ?
The conception of voluntariness in confession law has a complex history, that at times has pitted different rationales and concerns against each other.
The theme of partnering the participant has several subthemes--ensuring voluntariness, ensuring understanding and providing participant advocacy.
(2006) 12 parents of children with cancer who were nearing the end of life Authors Method Miller & Nelson (2012) Parents completed questionnaire 10 days after enrollment to indicate voluntariness in decision making Hinds et al.
The Conclusion provides a revision of my proposal to return to the voluntariness standard by focusing on factors that will provide better guidance to lower courts in assessing the putative "voluntariness" of a confession.
The second is to investigate whether voluntariness moderates these relationships.
pretrial reliability hearings, apart from pretrial voluntariness
a fear of police excesses, the voluntariness test was re conceptualized
A survey with closed-ended questions was administered to 279 mothers (139 Turkish mothers and 140 South Korean mothers) who were included in the study according to the principle of voluntariness. The research results indicated that Turkish and South Korean mothers have some similar views as well as some different views.
competency assessment, disclosure of information and voluntariness.1
For example, Long argues that the desire to protect refugees from the Stalinist regime in Soviet Russia played a key role in the international adoption of the principle of "voluntariness" as a prerequisite for refugee return.
Terminology differs, but on one account the speech-act that is given by a person without satisfying one of these conditions (competence, information, or voluntariness) is not consent.