vomitorium


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vomitorium

A Vomitory in an ancient Roman theater or amphitheater.
References in periodicals archive ?
20 -- Mirpur: The vomitorium was deserted, extensively littered with '4' and '6' placards.
Instead, the media construct of 'Binge Britain' is a ritual repetition of the idea that night-time public space has been transformed into a violent vomitorium that is a no-go zone for all but the carousing youth who are lost to it.
It's a fun and friendly place - particularly the Nitelink service in Dublin that sometimes resembles what the last days of Rome must have been like, vomitorium included.
The overindulgence of which possibly, but probably apocryphally, led to the introduction of the vomitorium.
A vomitorium was a passageway in an amphitheater that 'vomited' spectators into their seats.
He began writing when Americans in Europe were a new, dramatic subject, and lived to see them so numerous that he called Venice "the vomitorium of Boston." He moved to Paris ten years after the end of the Civil War and died during World War I.
As for the director--hidden in a corner seat, having long abandoned the pointless exercise of note taking, I had only one wish left in the world: to sink into the theatre vomitorium and be deposited directly into the underworld.
Memory again becomes compelling as the migrants review the oil boom wealth of their nation and cannot make out why the "surplus value / of hope" has become "raised to the brim of vomitorium." (35)
This separation was not exclusive, however, as Antipholus of Ephesus and the merchants entered from the vomitorium at downstage right and moved back and forth diagonally across the stage throughout the scene, while Dromio of Syracuse remained seated at his door up stage right, performing inside while entirely oblivious to the other characters onstage with him.
Roger Ebert calls it `a gaudy vomitorium of a movie, violent, nauseating and a pretty good example of its genre.'