vowel

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Related to vowel sound: Consonant sound

vowel

A vowel is a letter that represents a speech sound made with one’s airway (the mouth and vocal chords) open and without touching one’s tongue to the teeth, lips, or the roof of the mouth. It is contrasted with consonants, which are formed by obstructing one’s airway in some way so as to create a harder, more defined speech sound. Together, vowels and consonants form syllables in speech.
There are five letters that are considered to be true vowels: A, E, I, O, and U.
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vowel

[′väu̇əl]
(linguistics)
A voiced "open sound," in which the quality of the sound is determined by its placement in the mouth.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Her IRD was 62% for words containing the vowel sound a, and 62% for words containing the vowel sound e.
In 5 (a) the NP Saliha ends with a vowel sound and it does not take Ergative marker though it functions as an Ergative subject as the verb does not agree with it.
Fifty six percent of the total number of subjects produced this sound correctly.40% mispronounced this vowel sound by substituting it with the long rounded back vowel,/u/.4% produced a variation in error.
The phonetic symbol in Table 4 (b) corresponds to the vowel sound in Standard American English bed.
It was observed that almost all students spoke syllabic timed English, the students having Panjabi or Urdu spoke fluently but exaggerated certain vowel sounds. Speakers of Sindhi had problems of articulation training and certain consonant and vowel sounds were unintelligible.
For native speakers of English, these two words contain two totally different vowel sounds and are virtually impossible to confuse.
Differences between vowel sounds are due primarily to differences in the posture of the tongue, lips, and jaw.
Unlike consonants, vowel sounds are produced with very little obstruction of airflow, resulting in a difference in the way they sound.
In Horse Latin, one inserts the syllable ib before each vowel sound in a word.
The vowel sound is the nucleus of the syllable, so the reader first locates the vowels.
The chief problem with "a" and "an" is using "a" before a vowel sound or "an" before a consonant sound--"a eagle," "a incident," "an gratuity," or "an historic," for example.