volcanism

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volcanism

(vol -kă-niz-ăm) Any of various processes whereby molten material, produced by interior heating, rises along with associated gases through the crust of a planet or satellite and bursts out upon the surface in the form of volcanic eruptions, geysers, etc. Active volcanism, which produces new crustal material, occurs not only on Earth but also on the satellites Io and Triton. Volcanism on the Moon produced the lava of the maria but largely ceased some three billion years ago. Evidence for past volcanism has also been found on Mars (see Mars, volcanoes), Venus, and several outer-planet satellites, such as Europa, Ganymede, Enceladus, Tethys, Ariel, and Titania.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

volcanism

[′väl·kə‚niz·əm]
(geology)
The movement of magma and its associated gases from the interior into the crust and to the surface of the earth. Also known as volcanicity.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vulcanism is still common, with volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and numerous hot springs, making Iceland one of the most active volcanic regions of the world.
We suggest three possible explanations for this: first, the kind of human use might not have contributed to the preservation of remains; second, the remains may have been overlooked by researchers; or third, vulcanism in the Ecuadorian Andes has hindered site discovery (Piperno & Pearsall, 1998).
Brongersma-Sanders (1957) compiled an exhaustive review of marine wildlife "catastrophes" and categorized the causes as vulcanism (volcanic activity), tectonic earth- and seaquake, change in salinity, temperature change, noxious waterbloom, lack of oxygen, and by poisonous gases, severe storms, as connected with spawning runs, by stranding, or uncertain.
Vulcanism has shaped much of the landscape, but sedimentary and metamorphic rocks are plentiful, and deposition of parent materials by alluvial, colluvial, and eolian processes is common (Walker and MacLeod 1991).
These environmentally sensitive areas will vary from location to location but are likely to include the following: flood plains, ocean surges, hurricane zones, tornadoes, tsunamis, earthquakes, vulcanism, wildfires, and subsidence.