Vulgarisms

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Vulgarisms

 

crude words that are unacceptable in standard speech or expressions that are incorrect in form.

Vulgarisms are sometimes introduced into the speech of characters of the text of a literary work as an intentional stylistic element in order to convey a certain everyday coloration—for example, “Akh, vam ne khotitsia l’ pod ruchku proitit’sia?” “Moi milyi! Konechno! Khotitsia, khotitsia” (“Ya wanna go for a walk?” “Sure I wanna”; E. Bagritskii). In present-day stylistics the term “popular speech” is used more often than the term “vulgarisms.”

References in periodicals archive ?
Bush spoke the vulgarism to his running mate, Dick Cheney, in an aside that was accidentally picked up by microphones.
However, Edkins (1864: 69) remarks that the word actually used in the Pekingese dialect (as opposed to standard Pekingese Mandarin of the day) was not tu but rather a sort of vulgarism pronounced teu (= modern standard dou).
No, "sucks" is not obscene, but used in which the way Beavis and Butthead use it, it is most certainly a vulgarism, and has no place in this magazine.
Occasionally, by way of compensation, Haber tries to liven things up by a sort of inarticulate vulgarism ('The Mower .
Who dares to speak of love or even question its hidden essences when we are surrounded by what many call, if you will pardon the vulgarism, "harsh reality" and its ugly and sordid concomitants?
He immediately put aside his initial vulgarism, and began with Gaudium et Spes, "The Constitution on the Church in the Modern World," which insists that the human person has sublime dignity.
The first line, whined by Sam Trammell as spoiled gent Thomas Walsingham, contains a familiar vulgarism referring to the female genitalia.
Before that come enough repetitions of a vulgarism for the female genitalia to put even "Closer" to shame, alongside dual impulses toward the scabrously funny and the maudlin that never coalesce.
Murakami's lexicon reflects a recent trend toward vulgarism, including four-letter words.
There are other distractions: The copy editor allowed the use of inanimate possessives, split infinitives, verb phrases broken by adverbs, and indefinite antecedents; "so" is used as a coordinating conjunction; there are numerous vague vulgarisms and inaccuracies such as "awful" [for "very bad"], "a lot" [meaning "many"], and "good deal" [for measurement].
In reality competition shows, broadcast in prime-time, the character-centred narratives often concentrate on communication between characters, their quarrels full of vulgarisms and their mutual hatred or affection.
Some children, wishing to attract attention or express their dissatisfaction and anger, repeat vulgarisms they had heard.