wage curve


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wage curve

[′wāj ‚kərv]
(industrial engineering)
A graphic representation of the relationship between wage rates and point values for key jobs.
References in periodicals archive ?
--(1994b), 'Estimating a British wage curve, 1973-1990', Economic Journal, September, pp.
In this 1969 paper, Lewis posited a market wage curve (the "market equalizing wage curve") whose slope depended on the underlying preferences of workers and employers.
Samuelson and Solow do not draw a wage curve in the manner of Phillips, but they take one as implicit, summarising the distinct behaviours of the different data groups as '[t]he apparent shift of our Phillips curve' (189).
Moreover, estimating the extent of wage rigidity in BiH is important for understanding monetary policy transmission mechanism between the Euro area and BiH and to analyze whether wage curve mechanisms are also in force in post-war BiH.
We use the Beveridge curve to substitute out n in the wage equation (19), from which we derive a relationship between w and [theta], labeled the "wage curve." The job creation condition can be rewritten in a similar way.
(1998), 'The German Wage Curve: Evidence from the IAB employment from West Germany', Economic Letters, 61, 135-142
His book The Wage Curve with Andrew Oswald won Princeton University's Richard A.
Meta-regression analysis (MRA), as explained here, helps readers to distinguish publication selection from genuine empirical effects, and these ten essays applies these methods to topical areas such as the effect of common currencies on international trade, economic freedom and economic growth, the convergence of the legendary two percent, the wage curve, the effects immigration on wages, the international gender wage gap and the income elasticity of money demand.