walk

(redirected from walkability)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Wikipedia.

walk

[wȯk]
(mathematics)
In graph theory, a set of vertices (v0, v1, …, vn ) in a graph, such that vi and vi +1are joined by a common edge for i = 0, 1, …, n- 1. Also known as path.

What does it mean when you dream about walking?

Walking in a dream can simply reflect our day-today experience of walking. If the act of walking is somehow emphasized in a dream, the dream might be alluding to the meaning of an idiom, such as to “walk out” on some situation, “walk on eggshells,” “walk on air,” “walk a thin line,” “walk all over someone,” “walk a tightrope,” or “walk and chew gum.”

walk

wales
A pedestrian path or passageway.

walk

(programming)
To Traverse a data structure, especially an array or linked-list in core.

See also codewalker, silly walk, clobber.

Walk

(dreams)
Many people see themselves walking along in a dream. It is very important to remember where you were walking to and if the walk was difficult or not. The way we move in dreams, or the means of transportation, may represent how efficiently we maneuver and progress on our own personal life journey. Also, is the means of transportation appropriate for the journey? For example, are you walking to your neighbor’s house or across the desert? Jung thought that if in your dream you are walking to no specific destination, it may represent a personal search and a succession of changes that one experiences in life. In order to understand the dream, considers whether you were walking around aimlessly or were swiftly going to a particular destination?
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, it reveals the importance given by the population in relation to walkability, revealing future possibilities to improve it.
The study uses perceived and objective walkability measures and objective greenness, as well as PA recorded with accelerometers.
Elinor Simons, M.D., Ph.D., from the University of Toronto, and colleagues evaluated associations between home neighborhood walkability and incident and ongoing childhood asthma using an administrative data cohort of 326,383 Toronto children born between 1997 and 2003 and followed until aged 8 to 15 years.
We used fixed and random effects longitudinal regression models to estimate associations within and between people over time to determine whether changes in neighborhood characteristics (street connectivity, residential density, and land-use mix) were associated with changes in the amount of walking for transport, after accounting for neighborhood walkability preference and timeinvariant confounders.
Such cities favor high-rise, mixed use, walkability and diversity.
Quantitative research findings suggest that neighbourhood connectivity, residential density, land use mix, diversity of destinations, and indices of overall walkability including Walk Score[R] (a publicly available, objectively derived walkability indicator) are associated with physical activity in longitudinal residential relocation studies [8-10].
Colorado-based ski boot manufacturer, Apex, offers a product unique to the winter sports market; a ski boot that offers comfort, walkability and high performance.
Jeff Speck's grandly titled General Theory of Walkability states that a journey on foot should satisfy four main conditions: be useful, safe, comfortable and interesting.
In fact, walkability alone is currently a key consideration for many home buyers or renters looking for ease of access to amenities.
"If you must cross major highways to get from point A to point B in a city, the walkability is low; people rely on cars," Scott Delp, a bioengineer who worked on the project, (http://www.bbc.com/news/health-40570442) said .
these numbers with each cities' walkability score, which is a crude measure of how easily citizens and visitors on foot can reach a variety of destinations such as shops, schools, churches, libraries, and municipal offices.
Christopher Leinberger, co-author of the report, explained his findings in a New York Times article: "There is a five-step 'ladder' of walkability, from least to most walkable.