walking machine

walking machine

[′wȯk·iŋ mə·shēn]
(mechanical engineering)
A machine designed to carry its operator over various types of terrain; the operator sits on a platform carried on four mechanical legs, and movements of his arms control the front legs of the machine while movements of his legs control the rear legs of the machine.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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I got on the crutches to strengthen my leg and started cycling and using a walking machine in the house."
The first bicycle was invented in Germany.In 1817, Baron von Drais invented a walking machine that would help him get around the royal gardens faster: two same-size in-line wheels, the front one steerable, mounted in a frame which you straddled.
Owner Loretta treats them like Hollywood stars too, with an indoor walking machine, specialist dog food and special treats.
After trips to the tip and re-organisation, the garage is looking once more like well, a garage, with space in which to work, or for me to locate a walking machine which, I have to admit, is tempting in this cold snap.
ONE-MAN walking machine Phillip Hartley has completed his latest charity trek in Tyneside.
Other attractions include the Mantis Walking Machine, a hydraulic six-legged robot, and Adrian Pritchard's Osmosis Machine, which will use gravity to create art, with paint dripping 10ft.
Experience of walking machine control in rough terrain conditions, which executioners are have, shows, that operator not always can effectively to control all moves, and for visual control of each leg movement, for example, in process of obstacle passage, large video sensors quantity is necessary.
Defence QC Mark Stewart said there was "not one iota of evidence" Madison had been attacked and she had actually been hurt that day in two accidents involving a walking machine and a bed.
"And I do so many licks on that, and then I go out to a walking machine in the garage and do a few licks on that, and then I come back in and get on the floor and do more stretching."
For instance, a Rex walking machine, designed by a company in New Zealand, allows the bionic man to step and stand, something which was developed for people who can't walk due to spinal injuries.
In 2012, after trying physical therapy and experimental treatments, Holbert met Contreras-Vidal, a neuroengineer who was working on fusing a robotic walking machine with a new type of BCI.