war crime

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war crime

a crime committed in wartime in violation of the accepted rules and customs of war, such as genocide, ill-treatment of prisoners of war, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
involving Nazi war criminal suspect, Konrad Kalejs, was prematurely
The theory that Netaji had been declared a war criminal surfaced once again during the Khosla Commission of Inquiry in 1971 that probed the disappearance of the freedom fighter.
Following the line of Zia another coup-deta general Ershad and after him Khaleda Zia, widow of Zia did the same to rehabilitate the war criminals and their party Jamat and Muslim league banned by Bangabandhu.
Perhaps Mr Page would like to include Sir Winston Churchill in his war criminal list for his order to destroy the French fleet at Mers-el-Kebir in 1940, or Bomber Harris for directing the bombing of Dresden in 1945.
People believe that the convicted war criminals not the ordinary Japanese people were to blame.
SOUNDBITE 2 Erich Priebke, Nazi war criminal (deceased) (Italian, 19 secs):
IT'S a sad indictment of our country when the state is supporting a war criminal who has admitted to killing "countless" people, yet low-income families, OAPs and the disabled are having benefits cut.
The United States' general policy towards those suspected of war crimes and crimes against humanity has been to deny them a safe haven, (87) If a suspected war criminal enters the United States, the United States has several options to deal with the suspect.
Handing over the war criminal Ratko Mladic promptly to ICTY to be tries, will make an important moral contribution to reduce the pain inflicted during the Bosnian War, which is the darkest and the bloodiest page of the European history after the Second World War.
THE Home Office has given 139 suspected war criminals the right to settle in Britain permanently.
The report, entitled Hitler's Shadow: Nazi War Criminals, US Intelligence, and the Cold War, describes numerous examples of an emerging pattern in the years after the war, when, to intelligence agencies, "settling scores with Germans or German collaborators seemed less pressing; in some cases, it even appeared counterproductive.