war driving


Also found in: Dictionary, Idioms.
Related to war driving: Bluejacking, piggybacking

war driving

Driving around an area with a laptop computer and an 802.11 wireless LAN adapter in order to find unsecured wireless LANs. When the laptop's wireless adapter (NIC) is set to promiscuous mode, it will receive any packets within its range. The goal is to find vulnerable sites either to obtain free Internet service or to potentially gain illegal access to the organization's data. See 802.11, Wi-Fi hotspot and war chalking.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"Companies recognize the importance of protecting their networks from hacker attacks and war driving, but oftentimes lack the means with which to ensure network safety," said Thomas Wagg, president of Integralis.
Them are new sections on spyware, hacktivism, war driving, RootKits, cyberterrorism, and firewalls and intrusion detection.
The BlueSecure intrusion-protection system includes a server application (BlueSecure Server) that provides WLAN administrators with an intuitive management interface to view all user activities, neighboring wireless LANs, rogue or unauthorized radio access points (AP), outside threats posed by war driving, and advanced correlation to detect wireless attacks.
The most innocent and well-known form of wireless hacking is called war driving. Wireless radios, scanning software and GPS receivers are used to locate and map access points across the country.
THE Queen will come face to face with her Second World War driving licence when she opens a new Army museum in Winchester today.
Known as "war driving," this new breed of hacker looks for free Internet access, access to confidential data and a new network to compromise.
"ActiveDefense is a unique solution to combat the growing threat of 'war driving' and wireless hacking," said Jay Chaudhry, CEO of AirDefense.
The term derives from "War Dialing"-using a predictive dialer to hack into modems, and "War Driving"-cruising the neighborhood with a WiFi-equipped laptop hoping to get online for free by borrowing a little of your bandwidth.
Private networks have an assumption of security, even if a "war driving" hacker manages to find a wireless access point.
Hot on the heels of 'war driving' (see Dangerous driving , May 2001) comes 'war chalking', the digital equivalent of the bush telegraph for hackers looking for unprotected wireless Internet access.
This relative ease of intrusion coupled with the expanding presence of badly configured wireless access points, gave rise to the hacker "sport" known as war driving. Tooling around in a car, equipped with a laptop, wireless card and software, such as NetStumbler, detecting and infiltrating wireless networks.