war paint


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war paint

painted decoration of the face and body applied by certain North American Indians before battle
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The post Plant of the Week: Plant used for war paint can treat warts and moles appeared first on Cyprus Mail .
In summer 2010, he says, director and playwright James Lapine introduced him to Lindy Woodhead's book War Paint and Ann Carol Grossman and Arnie Reisman's documentary The Powder & the Glory--works chronicling the careers of Helena Rubinstein and Elizabeth Arden, fierce competitors who each built 20th-century cosmetic empires.
Or you can pretend to be a Native American by slapping your picture with war paint, feather, and broaded nose, because we all know that that is all that it takes to represent "Indians".
Girls love make-up, my two-year-old daughter sits next to mummy when she's putting her war paint on and pretends she's doing the same.
With their faces streaked in white war paint and their hairstyles far more creative than most of ours, Fifth Nation will bring a gorgeous, indie voice, bluesy, electric guitar and sharp beats to the Lucky Dog.
She applies more war paint and, what's more, she won't be as prudish about her ankles being shown" Craig Revel Horwood, above, a judge on Strictly Come Dancing, hopes ex-Tory MP Edwina Currie will come on the show "He thought he was doing his best to be British and keep his chin up.
The panel depicting First Nations people includes a young boy with the traditional haircut and wearing war paint.
The group revealed they think of it like war paint and have always applied it themselves.
CATANIA president Pietro Lo Monaco has put on the war paint after star striker Giuseppe Mascara suffered sickening abuse from Fiorentina fans.
Lecture topics: War paint, beadwork, quilts, domestic embroidery
Heat 2: 1 Royal Warrior, 2 Side Bet, 3 Tinas Polaris, 4 War Paint (m), 5 Shanacashel Lad (m), 6 Fast Piper (w).
The topics range chronologically from the engagingly titled "How Indians Got Red" (apparently from their war paint, among other factors) to articles on the takeover of Alcatraz and the current struggle of smaller tribes to gain federal recognition.