ward

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Related to ward off: point out, out of commission, wreak havoc

ward

ward. 1 In English history, see hundred. 2 In law, see guardian and ward. 3 In local government, see city government.
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ward

1. A metal obstruction in a lock; intended to prevent entrance or rotation of a key that does not fit the lock.
2. The outer defenses of a castle. Also see bailey.
3. A division in a hospital.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ward

1. (in many countries) a district into which a city, town, parish, or other area is divided for administration, election of representatives, etc.
2. a room in a hospital, esp one for patients requiring similar kinds of care
3. one of the divisions of a prison
4. Law
a. a person, esp a minor or one legally incapable of managing his own affairs, placed under the control or protection of a guardian or of a court
b. guardianship, as of a minor or legally incompetent person
5. the state of being under guard or in custody
6. 
a. an internal ridge or bar in a lock that prevents an incorrectly cut key from turning
b. a corresponding groove cut in a key

Ward

1. Dame Barbara (Mary), Baroness Jackson. 1914--81, British economist, environmentalist, and writer. Her books include Spaceship Earth (1966)
2. Mrs Humphry, married name of Mary Augusta Arnold. 1851--1920, English novelist. Her novels include Robert Elsmere (1888) and The Case of Richard Meynell (1911)
3. Sir Joseph George. 1856--1930, New Zealand statesman; prime minister of New Zealand (1906--12; 1928--30)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The three translated messages are a recent remark made by Joseph Stiglitz, Nobel-prize laureate in economics, in an interview with the Nation of Thiland urging governments worldwide to ward off dangerous hot money, the suggestion of the United Nations for developing nations to prevent massive influx of hot money via one or multiple methods even including capital control, and the conclusion in the communique of G7 warning the impact of swing in forex rates on economic and financial stability.
If, as psychoanalyst and art historian Ernst Kris writes, masks are apotropaic--Messerschmidt's masklike grimaces exist to ward off the fear that they express--then one might say that Carmi's masks ward off his fear of the older generation by disregarding their feelings.
The author covers hats to ward off rain and glare, union suits, infant dress, parasols, gloves, hairstyles, and Southwestern Indian feathers and buckskin.
Omega-3 fats may ward off dry eye syndrome by curbing inflammation in the tear gland and eye surface, say researchers.
It's been credited with fighting heart disease, lowering blood pressure and helping ward off colds.
One of Meyer's favorite facts: In early American history, the ash was believed to have special powers to ward off sickness and evil spirits.
In a six-month trial of the lightweight, hand-held tools, musicians all over the country have learned to ward off pain and injury by incorporating Glove into their practice routines, ninety-second warm-up with the WOW and less than two minutes of resetting with The Reset Glove.
Research into the fruit's ability to reduce stroke-induced damage caused by inflammation may eventually lead to patients taking a glass of blueberry juice or a tablet to ward off atherosclerosis, heart attacks, and type 2 diabetes.
What is the truth about taking garlic supplements to ward off illness and cure common diseases?
Nabhan takes the reader to the cliffs of Sardinia, where fava beans help ward off malaria due to a genetic trait in the ethnic population; the highlights of Crete where the native's olive-oil-soaked diets are healthy for their bodies, but not for western visitors; as well as the American Southwest and neotropical Mexico where fiery chile peppers help kill meat-spoiling microbes so prevalent in desert and tropical climates.
Antibiotics are commonly used in food animal production to treat illness, promote growth, and ward off disease.
Christianity is at pains to emphasize the full humanity of Christ, precisely to ward off a kind of perverse asceticism.