wardite


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wardite

[′wȯr‚dīt]
(mineralogy)
Na4CaAl12(PO4)8(OH)18·6H2O A blue-green to pale green, tetragonal mineral consisting of a hydrated basic phosphate of sodium, calcium, and aluminum.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The mine is also the type locality for the phosphates englishite, gordonite, millisite, montgomeryite, overite and wardite.
Davison (1840-1915) at the University of Rochester examined the material and from it extracted a new species, which he named wardite after Henry A.
We had discovered a well-crystallized specimen of a quite rare phosphate mineral, wardite. I had first seen the mineral on display in the Morgan Hall in the American Museum of Natural History, where it stood out as bluish veinlets and small, spherical eye-like shapes within two beautiful polished slabs of variscite that had come from the original mining at Fairfield.
Larsen (1942b) made a detailed study of the paragenetic relationships in the evolution of variscite nodules in the Clay Canyon deposit, identifying six stages: (1) variscite formation, followed by fracturing and the introduction of thin black quartz veinlets; (2) banded minerals, primarily crandallite, millisite and wardite, replacing and enclosing variscite while opening up cavities through shrinkage (some variscite nodules were entirely replaced by crandallite); (3) formation of free-growing crystals of gordonite, englishite, montgomeryite and probably overite and kolbeckite in cavities; (4) a minor reversion to crandallite formation from solution as isolated oolites; (5) apatite-group minerals; and finally (6) the limonitic phase (limonite is not present inside any of the nodules).
To top it off, the Tysons offered a handful of fine thumbnail wardite specimens, with sharp, lustrous, pale blue-green pseudo-octahedral wardite crystals to 1.5 cm associated with white microcrystals of goyazite; and they offered a few exceptional clusters of glassy pale green augelite crystals, and sprays of dark blue-green acicular gormanite as well.
At the Main Show, the Tyson's Minerals stand showed off sparkling, mostly thumbnail and miniature specimens of, among others, lustrous shaving-brush aggregates of acicular, deep blue gormanite crystals on beds of sharp, gemmy brown, rhombohedral siderite crystals; very lustrous, high-quality, sharp, blue-black lazulite crystals to 1.5 cm on siderite druses with quartz; white hexagonal-tabular crystals of whitlockite to 2 cm; lustrous pseudo-octahedral wardite crystals to 1.5 cm, in varying hues of colorless, green, yellow and brown: translucent white apatite prisms to 5 mm in little groups; and the rare arrojadite as lustrous brown, platy crystals to 3 mm densely covering matrix.
(1957a) Relationship of the minerals avelinoite, cyrilovite and wardite. American Mineralogist, 42, 204-213.
Wardite (HCWS) (ND, 15.2, HM n/a, D7 49.5, EM 42.2).
Four minerals (spiroffite, ferrinatrite, manasseite, and wardite) are not in HM because the volumes which would contain these species have not been published yet.
One other item of interest was wardite crystals associated with childrenite and eosphorite, from the famous locality of Rapid Creek, Yukon.
Associated minerals in the cavities are: wardite, eosphorite, cyrilovite, a kidwellite-like mineral, rockbridgeite, leucophosphite, saleeite and montmorillonite.
The Tysons also have more newly collected Yukon phosphates (particularly some very fine whiteite, collinsite and wardite) as well as some new pale yellow-green gemmy fluorapatite crystals and velvety black dravite/schorl specimens from the Scepter claim near Emerald Lake, Hess Mountains, Yukon.