wardrobe


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Wikipedia.

wardrobe

the collection of costumes belonging to a theatre or theatrical company

wardrobe, garderobe

A room for the storage of garments.
References in classic literature ?
They informed me that Miss Rachel flatly refused to have her wardrobe examined.
I flung the bottle at it, and it seemed to climb on to that wardrobe.
You are such a genius for planning and working wonders, that I throw myself upon you and ask, 'How shall I make a spring wardrobe out of nothing?
As she passed out of sight, the lady on the second floor (no other, it is needless to add, than the Countess herself) ran swiftly down the stairs, entered the bed-chamber by the principal door, and hid herself in the empty side compartment of the wardrobe.
And he did not stop there; for in order to wipe out the memory of what they had undergone, he commanded that the tailor, the doctor, the purveyor and the merchant, should each be clothed in his presence with a robe from his own wardrobe before they returned home.
I felt myself being pushed into a little room contiguous to the wardrobe room.
She began slowly to adjust the trimmings, in preparation for returning it to its place in the wardrobe, and her thoughts seemed to have taken a melancholy turn, for she shook her head.
Now I'm ready," said Amy, shutting the wardrobe and taking a piece of paper out of her pocket.
Reed herself, at far intervals, visited it to review the contents of a certain secret drawer in the wardrobe, where were stored divers parchments, her jewel-casket, and a miniature of her deceased husband; and in those last words lies the secret of the red-room--the spell which kept it so lonely in spite of its grandeur.
I tell you what, if there had been a real Jess and she had boasted to me about her cloak with beads, I would have said to her in a careless sort of voice, "Step across with me, Jess and I'll let you see something that is hanging in my wardrobe.
As we were so closely connected, and on the whole were affectionate as became brothers and sisters, it was the common wish that we might not be separated, but go together into the same wardrobe, let it be foreign or domestic, that of prince or plebeian.
Let them have my wardrobe cart," said the countess.