warm sector


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warm sector

[′wȯrm ‚sek·tər]
(meteorology)
The area of warm air, within the circulation of a wave cyclone, which lies between the cold front and warm front of a storm.
References in periodicals archive ?
This put areas impacted by enhanced ozone within the warm sector. The surface low and associated cold front swept through Maryland by 1700 UTC 16 April.
1a was the result of the northward progression of the warm sector after ozone had been deposited at the surface behind the thunderstorm gust front.
During the time of the ozone increase (1000-1300 UTC) at HU-Beltsville and Essex, both sites recorded a drop in CO concentrations to as low as 30 ppbv at HU-Beltsville and 17 ppbv at Essex, with an average of 51 ppbv within the warm sector. This was followed by a rebound in CO concentrations behind the cold front to an average of 120 ppbv.
These two storms were "atmospheric rivers," in which long plumes of moisture in the warm sector just ahead of the cold front are advected by the low-level jet ahead of the front.
Warm sector rain contributed to Chehalis flood- ing.
For example, she refers to the cold circumpolar vortex as the "polar calotte" or cap, cold air pressing southward as a "spreading cold tongue," nascent waves on the polar front as spiral-formed "breakers," and the three vertical cells of the general circulation as "running like cogged wheels." Following Bergeron, she called the cyclone stage, when the cold front just overtakes the warm sector, a "seclusia" and the final stage, when the warm front is completely overtaken by the cold, an "occlusia." Summertime showery weather was referred to as "amoeba" cyclones.
Your best alternates will be found either south in the warm sector or to the north away from the strongest lift.
A warm sector is the forecasting term for whatever exists equatorward of the warm and cold fronts.
Like Virginia, the region can rightly be considered under the influence of a warm sector. This warm sector extends to the tropopause.
Results show that atmospheric rivers are formed by the cold front that sweeps up water vapor in the warm sector as it moves cyclonically toward the warm front.
These heavy precipitation events often occur when warm moist air, located in the cyclones warm sector, encounters orography (e.g., along the west coast of the United States or United Kingdom), resulting in significant precipitation enhancement (Hand et al.