homeotherm

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homeotherm

[′hō·mē·ə‚thərm]
(physiology)
An endotherm that maintains a constant body temperature, as do most mammals and birds.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, samples also tested positive for Toxoplasma gondii, one of the most common parasitic infections of man and other warm-blooded animals. Nearly one-third of humanity has been exposed to this parasite.
Toxoplasmosis, a disease caused by Toxoplasma gondii parasite, is one of the most worldwide parasitic infections of warm-blooded animals including man.
Warm-blooded animals were particularly at risk, with species of sea cows and baleen whales dying out.
Building on evidence that retinal receptors embodying visual qualia evolved from primitive eyespots responsive to injurious heat at a distance or painful light, the third chapter presents evidence that visually imagined sensations are the subjective qualities of retinal receptors that are corticofugally innervated in warm-blooded animals for the developmental purpose of testing cortically hypothesized sensory-motor rules that have greater survival value than cold-blooded stimulus-response associations.
When an infected rodent becomes sick and dies, its fleas can carry the infection to other warm-blooded animals or humans.
Anthrax, an acute infectious disease caused by infection with Bacillus anthracis, can affect almost all warm-blooded animals, including humans (1).
Over the next few decades, most paleontologists came to think of dinosaurs as more birdlike: warm-blooded animals, or endotherms, that grew quickly, expended lots of energy and regulated their body heat internally.
Researchers at the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute have identified a genetic program that promotes longevity of roundworms in cold environments -- and this genetic program also exists in warm-blooded animals, including humans.
Virtually all warm-blooded animals, including humans are commonly infected with members of the genus Isospora.
As the world heats up, scientists have noted that these naturally shy warm-blooded animals are retreating away from their usual hangouts in favour of cooler climes, making them all the more elusive.
Scientists long have known that body temperature fluctuates in warm-blooded animals throughout the day on a 24-hour.
He said the department's animal and plant health inspection services performs unannounced inspections of all zoos, circuses and facilities that use warm-blooded animals for medical research to make sure they are in compliance with the federal act's care standards.