warp

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warp:

see weavingweaving,
the art of forming a fabric by interlacing at right angles two or more sets of yarn or other material. It is one of the most ancient fundamental arts, as indicated by archaeological evidence.
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Warp

Distortion in the shape of a plane timber surface, due to the movement of moisture; may be caused by improper seasoning.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Warp

 

in weaving, the parallel threads running lengthwise in a fabric. A fabric is formed on a loom by sucessively interweaving two perpendicular systems of threads, the warp and the weft. During weaving, the warp threads are stretched and bent much more than the weft threads. They also are abraded more by the loom. Therefore, the yarn for the warp must be stronger, have more twist, and be made from higher quality fibers than the weft. It is often treated with a glue solution, or sizing, before weaving.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

warp

[wȯrp]
(geology)
An upward or downward flexure of the earth's crust.
A layer of sediment deposited by water.
(navigation)
To move a vessel or other waterborne object from one point to another by pulling on lines fastened to a fixed buoy, wharf, or such.
(textiles)
Yarn extending lengthwise, under tension on a loom. Also known as end.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

warp

1. See carpet warp.
2. Distortion in shape of a parallel plane surface; in lumber, usually results from a change in moisture content.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

warp

1. a mental or moral deviation
2. the yarns arranged lengthways on a loom, forming the threads through which the weft yarns are woven
3. the heavy threads used to reinforce the rubber in the casing of a pneumatic tyre
4. Nautical a rope used for warping a vessel
5. alluvial sediment deposited by water
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Warp

This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

WARP

(1) See OS/2 Warp.

(2) A parallel processor developed at Carnegie-Mellon University that was the predecessor of iWARP.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Huang and Tai [16] have used computer simulations (C-MOLD[TM]) with the assistance of the Taguchi method to determine the effective molding parameters that affect the warpage behavior of a molded, box-shaped geometric part.
[19] have used the Taguchi method to investigate the warpage problem related to shrinkage variation, which can be reduced by modulating the molding parameters (injection time, packing pressure, packing time, and cooling time) for molded thin-shell features.
A similar approach has been used by Erzurumlu and Ozcelik [14] to investigate the minimization of the warpage and sink index of molded thermoplastic parts.
Experimental results indicate that warpage is minimized in the first two geometries by processing at the largest values of mold and melt temperature, injection time, and cooling time.
Packing pressure plays a larger role in driving warpage in these geometries, while the importance of injection time is reduced.
Finally, Moldflow's MF/Warp was used to compute the part shrinkage and warpage. The inputs to this calculation were the meshed model from the MF/Flow analysis, Young's modulus parallel and perpendicular to flow, and Poisson's ratio.
The z-direction warpage is quantified by the difference between the z-direction displacements of points [Z.sub.1] and [Z.sub.2].
This study divides all measured shrinkage and warpage data into training sets and testing sets (see the discussion below).
Through analysis and comparison, the simulation results of thickness distribution, temperature field, thermal stress and warpage for plastic part are in good agreement with the experimental results.
For the cooling stage of plastic thermoforming, the thermal-stress and warpage are analyzed, assuming that the thermal deformation during cooling stage is elastic.
Second, the viscoelastic model used here to simulate the thermally induced warpage of the polymeric plate is a linear one (i.e., the strain rate is linearly proportional to the stress); however, in reality, a polymeric material tends to exhibit non-linear viscoelastic properties.
A final series of numerical runs were conducted to compare the behavior of four different material models in predicting the warpage: linear elastic, elastic phase transformation, viscoelastic, and viscoelastic phase transformation models.