warrant

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warrant

warrant, in law, written order by an official of a court directed to an officer. The search warrant and the warrant of arrest are the most frequently used types. Warrants of attachment order the seizure of a defendant's goods pending trial or judicial determination of ownership and in certain other cases. Warrants are usually issued by a judge or court clerk. They are directed to sheriffs, marshals, constables, and other officers of the peace. The strictest compliance with legal forms and rules for serving a warrant is ordinarily necessary if it is to be effective.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Warrant

 

in the civil law of a number of states (France, Great Britain, the USA, Japan, and others), a document that is issued to the owner of goods when he places them in storage. Usually the warrant consists of two parts—a warehouse certificate and the warrant itself. It is a kind of security, since the owner of the goods may sell the warrant or use it as a pledge. He may also transfer the warrant by means of endorsement.

REFERENCE

Grazhdanskoe i torgovoe pravo kapitalisticheskikh gosudarstv. Moscow, 1966. Pages 324-35.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

warrant

[′wär·ənt]
(geology)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

warrant

1. a document that certifies or guarantees, such as a receipt for goods stored in a warehouse, a licence, or a commission
2. Law an authorization issued by a magistrate or other official allowing a constable or other officer to search or seize property, arrest a person, or perform some other specified act
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005