water moccasin


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water moccasin

or

cottonmouth,

highly venomous snakesnake,
common name for an elongated, limbless reptile of the order Squamata, which also includes the xlizards. Most snakes live on the ground, but some are burrowers, arboreal, or aquatic; one group is exclusively marine. In temperate climates they hibernate.
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, Ancistrodon piscivorus, of the swamps and bayous of the S United States. Like the closely related copperhead, it is a pit viperpit viper,
poisonous snake of the family Crotalidae, primarily a New World family. Like the Old World true vipers (family Viperidae), pit vipers have long, hollow, erectile fangs that are folded back against the roof of the mouth except when the snake is striking.
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 and has a heat-sensitive organ for detecting warm-blooded prey. The young are born live. The young snake is a pale reddish brown with transverse dark brown bands edged with white; as it ages the colors dull to a blotched olive or brown and then to an unmarked olive or blackish in old specimens. The maximum length is 6 ft (2 m), the average from 3 to 4 ft (90–120 cm). A good climber, the water moccasin often relaxes on branches overhanging the water. If startled it erects its head and shows the white interior of its mouth—hence the name cottonmouth. It eats both warm-blooded and cold-blooded animals. It is aggressive in the wild state but may become quite tame in captivity. It is classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Reptilia, order Squamata, family Crotalidae.

water moccasin

[′wȯd·ər ‚mäk·ə·sən]
(vertebrate zoology)
Agkistrodon piscivorus. A semiaquatic venomous pit viper; skin is brownish or olive on the dorsal aspect, paler on the sides, and has indistinct black bars. Also known as cottonmouth.

water moccasin

(also cottonmouth) highly poisonous snake found in southern U.S. [Zoology: NCE, 2490]
References in periodicals archive ?
Water moccasins, rattlesnakes, and copperheads are pit vipers and ubiquitous where I live.
But my neighbors were convinced both their pond and mine teemed with water moccasins. What they actually saw were water snakes that would periodically arrive after a nighttime trek from a river a half-mile away.
The poisonous water moccasin came out of a lake and slithered alongside the 18th green close to Monty.
I once watched helplessly as my grandfather broke out only paddle on a stump while dispatching a water moccasin. Sadly, there was no cooler or broom aboard, and the water was a few inches too deep for barrel-poling.
Vet Steve Divey said he saw one one snake, called a water moccasin or cottonmouth, whose drinking bowl was dry.
We are also given further information about Miranda's abilities by way of Smithfield's memories of two instances when Miranda has actually performed surgery, has "picked up a knife" -- ...once when Parris got bit by a water moccasin, and then the time when Reema's oldest boy was about to kill 'em both by coming out hind parts first.
Jumping into a pit blind and discovering a coiled water moccasin lying in wait at the bottom--this, friends, gives jumpshooting a whole new meaning.
In Florida, we lived on a large lake opposite what was then "Cypress Gardens." The name derived from the cypress trees that lined the lakefront, providing porches of sorts for water moccasins that liked to spool around the cypress knees protruding from the shore's sandy bottom.
I was looking for water moccasins to hit me at any time," he said.
We were always on the lookout for water moccasins. No one ever got bit, but one day we did have a bobcat run up on us while a bunch of us were fishing.
Copperhead "behavior is very much like that of most other pit vipers," Beane said in the article, comparing the species to rattlesnakes and water moccasins. Pit vipers have "heat-sensory pits between eye and nostril on each side of head," he mentioned, and therefore the reptiles have the capability to detect minute differences in temperature and as a result strike precisely the source of the heat, which is often their potential prey.
the water moccasins and the water spiders and the one old bridle from