water scrubber

water scrubber

[′wȯd·ər ‚skrəb·ər]
(chemical engineering)
A device or system in which gases are contacted with water (either by spray or bubbling through) to wash out traces of water-soluble components of the gas stream.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
'Our filtration and water scrubber system has an efficiency of up to 98 per cent of suppression of dioxin and furan is at the efficiency level of 99.9 per cent.'
Fumes from the pickling process are extracted and pass through a water scrubber unit before release to atmosphere.
As for the Absorbent W(r) water scrubber, she says, "You can pour the (soiled) water through it and clean water will come out the other end."
Instead, Tyler Pipe concealed the construction of the new cupola from the TCEQ and connected its new cupola to the existing pollution control device, a water scrubber designed and built in the 1960s.
In addition, a good water scrubber would ensure that the emission of dangerous chemical substances would be reduced to very negligible quantities, because no "chemical layer" can absorb or adsorb all the different substances that may be present.
The three-story building houses a 6,000 gallon reactor system, water scrubber, treatment system and miscellaneous equipment.
Many permissible applications use standard cellulose filters combined with water scrubbers to lower the temperature of exhaust.
"We are installing water scrubbers that will capture SO2 gases and particles before they escape the emissions stack," Thompson says.