watering hole


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watering hole

1. a pool where animals drink; water hole
2. Facetious slang a pub
References in periodicals archive ?
She first noticed this apparent watering hole "departure" conversation years ago while observing the elephants in the wilds.
Tommy Watts, 72, thepub's long-timelandlord, said last night he was pleased to hand over watering hole to TV star Morrisey.
CAMRA, the Campaign for Real Ale, also backed the campaign to save the pub, and held a protest meeting in December 2000 backed by drinkers who have made it their local watering hole for many decades.
LEAMINGTON'S newest watering hole, The Breeze Bar, in Spencer Street, will be formally opened on March 1.
GAZZA'S favourite Scots watering hole has been priced at more than pounds 4million.
The juice made from baby wheat shoots is already popular at one British watering hole, the South Beach Cafe in Baker Street, London.
s new store at 21 Bond Street, and the popular watering hole, Bowery Bar, at the corner of Bond and Bowery.
One of the focal points for the ever-growing festival, this watering hole is not only a bar, it is firmly established as an innovative platform for rising talent and is part of the cultural fabric of the city.
Trager has converted the former bar Grady's, a well-known watering hole that opened at 6 a.
A typical morning started with five or six trips to the watering hole to make sure everyone, including the animals.
TEAM WORK: Steve Suggitt, Dr Ann Worsley and Gerry Lucas study material from the watering hole
A year later, Koschkarow invited thirty friends to Malkasten, an upscale Dusseldorf watering hole whose name means "paint box.