wave forecasting

wave forecasting

[′wāv ′fȯr‚kast·iŋ]
(oceanography)
The theoretical determination of future wave characteristics based on observed or forecasted meteorological phenomena.
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However, huge amounts of atmospheric dust could lead to corrosion in aircraft engines, wearing them out rapidly, putting thousands of lives at risk, said University of Athens atmospheric and air pollution modelling weather and wave forecasting division director Professor George Kallos.
Wave forecasting began during World War II, when the U.S.
The proposed approach for adaptive wave forecasting uses the idea of harmonic structure analysis of wave time series represented as a number of harmonic superposition with tuning frequencies.
In the United States, wave guidance is provided by the Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) of the NWS, which has a group of experts dedicated to wave forecasting. The EMC has provided wave guidance based on nine grids covering their area of responsibility, ranging from a global resolution of 0.5[degrees] to fine-resolution grids of up to 1/15[degrees] covering U.S.
The use of operational wave and storm surge models in the United States is possible in part because of long-term federal funding to the storm surge and wave forecasting programs at NOAA (e.g., the Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project started with a $13 million amendment to NOAA's budget; Gall et al.