wave theory of light


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wave theory of light

[′wāv ′thē·ə·rē əv ′līt]
(optics)
A theory which assumes that light is a wave motion, rather than a stream of particles.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, by the 1830s, the corpuscular, or particle, theory of light proposed by Newton was superseded by the wave theory of light: this theoretical shift is often cited as a good example of conceptual change in science (Cantor [1983]; Chen [1988]; Buchwald [1989]; Achinstein [1991]).
He also explicitly rejected the wave theory of light:
Newton's rejection of the wave theory of light and advocacy of the particle theory convinced many scientists of his day that light was indeed a particle.
Though the wave theory of light had been supported in the early seventeenth century by Descartes (1596-1650) and the Dutch mathematician Huygens (1629-95), it lost general acceptance upon publication of Newton's particle theory in Opticks.
Shapiro, 'Kinematic Optics: A study of the Wave Theory of Light in the Seventeenth Century', Archives for History of Exact Sciences, vol.
Buchwald, The Rise of the Wave Theory of Light: Optical Theory and Experiment in the Early Nineteenth Century, Chicago, The University of Chicago Press, 1989, p.
Before assuming that (i) is wrong, one has to examine (ii) from the point of view of the wave theory of light under the condition of constancy of speed of light.
The theory of Michelson-Morley interference experiment is revisited from the point of view of the wave theory of light. The fallacy of using the accepted formula based on the emission theory of light is shown and new formulas are derived based on the correct posing of the boundary conditions at moving boundaries for a hyperbolic equation.
When he died, the majority supported Huygens's wave theory of light. Today we have an excellent compromise.