wave number

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wave number

[′wāv ‚nəm·bər]
(physics)
The reciprocal of the wavelength of a wave, or sometimes 2π divided by the wavelength. Also known as reciprocal wavelength.

Wave Number

 

a quantity related to the wavelength λ by the ratio k = 2π/λ (the number of waves in a length of 2 π). In spectroscopy the reciprocal of the wavelength (I/λ.) is often called the wave number.

wave number

The reciprocal of a wavelength (i.e., 1/λ or 2/λ, where λ is the wavelength).
References in periodicals archive ?
From [FWHM.sub.K] = 2[[sigma].sub.k] [square root of (2 ln 2)] and the relation between the wavenumber k and wavelength [lambda] the [FWHM.sub.z] is
Caption: Figure 2: Coefficient of [K.sub.R.sup.2] + [K.sub.T.sup.2] + [eta] versus the dimensionless wavenumber kh.
Again, intensities of the absorptions have been adjusted to clarify positioning along the wavenumber axis.
In the wavenumber region of 1900-1300 [cm.sup.-1] the C=O stretching vibration peaks at 1730 [cm.sup.-1] can be found.
For this event we obtain [k.sub.local] = 0.081 [m.sup.-1] and [c.sub.local] = 12.6 m/s (with [U.sub.1] = 1 m/s), which is 10% higher than the linear estimate based on the global wavenumber of the wave series.
Where R([omega]) is the reflectance and is the phase change between the incident and reflected signals for a particular wavenumber [omega].
For a given real wavenumber k, the complex angular frequency can be obtained as [omega] = [[omega].sub.r] + i[[omega].sub.i], by solving a simple polynomial equation of third degree, for which numerical and even closed form solutions exist.
In this case, the C-O-P band shifts to a higher wavenumber (1122 [cm.sup.-1]) with an increase in intensity and a decrease peak width.
Here we consider the real wavenumber and find the complex solutions of the frequency as [[omega].sub.r] + i[[omega].sub.i],.
The FTIR instrument operates in a single-beam mode and is capable of data collection over a wavenumber range of 400-4000 [cm.sup.-1] with a resolution of 0.5 cm Beach sand collected before the BP oil well explosion was used as reference baseline.
The instability regions of a uniform Stokes wave in the perturbed wavenumber plane obtained from this equation are found to be in better agreement with the exact results of McLean et al.