wavy grain

wavy grain

A curly figure in wood grain, similar to fiddleback, but with more uniform ripples and waves.
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Some varieties of maple are relatively lightweight, reasonably tough, and easily finished, but don't "work" as easily as walnut, partly because they often have really wavy grain, tending to splinter in odd directions.
The wood usually has an interlocked or wavy grain and can be difficult to work because of the alternately hard and soft nature of the grain.
Because the cut crosses the wavy grain at a somewhat radial approach, it leaves a repeating pattern of end-grain, flat-grain, end-grain, giving the resulting surface an almost iridescent three-dimensional look that is greatly enhanced with the application of finish materials.
In the former, a knot in the wood provides a beauty spot on the breast of a voluptuous blond, while in the latter, an expanse of wavy grain echoes the curves of a recumbent brunette's thighs.
Disclosed herein is a new kind of veneer which has the cross grain (such as wavy grain and interlocked grain) artificially formed on the surface of straight-grained veneer cut by quarter sawing from a species of wood which should yield the cross grain but actually has no cross grain.
Generally, these tables are simple in design, which makes them versatile, but they are hand-crafted of rare and wonderful woods such as jumu or juanghuali, which has a wavy grain and knots, or zitan, which is dark brown with purple undertones.
Experts recommend a reduced cutting angle when planing interlocked or wavy grain.
May have slight dulling effect on cutting edges, especially when wavy grain is present.
You'll notice that the rift-sawn oak has a very straight grain in contrast to the wavy grain pattern of quarter-sawn oak.
Wood is usually straight grained and coarse textured but can have an irregular or wavy grain.
Often called "tiger-stripe" oak because of its wavy grain pattern, it's actually quarter-sawn oak.