weapon delivery

weapon delivery

[′wep·ən di‚liv·ə·rē]
(ordnance)
The total action required to locate the target, establish the necessary release conditions, and maintain guidance to the target if required; it includes the detection recognition and the acquisition of the target, and the weapon release and weapon guidance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Contract Awarded for The development and fielding of intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance, and targeting systems to improve warfighter situational awareness and weapon delivery capabilities
Tejas has also successfully demonstrated weapon delivery capability during trials at Jamnagar and Jaisalmer, HAL officials said.
For his part, Secretary of State John Kerry also welcomed in a separate statement this, saying "this is also an important moment to take stock of what has been achieved: the removal of all declared chemicals; verification of the destruction of declared production, mixing, and filling equipment; verification of the destruction of all declared chemical weapon delivery vehicles, including missile warheads and aerial bombs; and diminishing the strategic threat posed by the Syrian chemical weapons program to our allies and partners in the region.
I'd like to ask her if she asked her Iranian hosts about the weapon delivery to the terror groups, and if she didn't ask, why not?
The pod provides laser ranging and designation to support weapon delivery, navigational functions, and recording and data-linking of generated imagery and data.
At the same time, all five legally recognised nuclear weapon states, China, France, Russia, the UK and the US are either deploying new nuclear weapon delivery systems or have announced programmes to do so, it added.
The Security Council urged states to 'exercise vigilance' over the bank's activities abroad to avoid contributing to 'proliferation-sensitive nuclear activities, or to the development of nuclear weapon delivery systems.
reprocessing or heavy water-related activities or to the development of nuclear weapon delivery systems.
It will take the country a year to further enrich that uranium to the 90 percent required for a bomb and "another year to develop the kind of weapon delivery system to make it viable," Panetta said in an interview with ABC's "This Week" program.
Tehran would need a year to enrich it fully to produce a bomb and it would take "another year to develop the kind of weapon delivery system in order to make that viable", he said.
Thus, readers seeking a full history of aerial navigation and weapon delivery will be disappointed.
Interfacing seamlessly with the APG-79, ATFLIR recorded the impact of the weapons against two diverse targets, confirming simultaneous weapon delivery while providing post-impact bomb damage information.