wearable computing

(redirected from wearable tech)

wearable computing

Electronic devices that are worn on the body or clothes. The first wearable computing devices were body-worn computers in the military, followed by consumer products such as MP3 players strapped to the arm and fitness devices that compute distance and heart rate. As of 2016, smartwatches, heads-up augmented reality displays, healthcare monitors and smart clothing are wearable technology products. Wearable electronics is expected to be a growth industry. See augmented reality, POV camera, fitness tracker, smart clothes, body-worn computer, smartwatch and Google Glass.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
GlobalData's latest thematic report, 'Wearable Tech in Oil & Gas', states that wearable devices can augment natural human capabilities, such as enhanced vision or smell, thereby adding to productivity and safety in oil field operations.
It works by simply attaching the wearable tech to the neck just like a temporary tattoo.A
Another wearable tech gadget includes motion sensors to activate a camera and synchronize with mobile devices.
The 5 day program had a host of interesting workshops, one such being creating a wearable tech device.
They visited the Bear Grylls Adventure in Birmingham to test Accesso's wearable tech device the Beartag.
In addition to this, one in five adults currently wears a smart watch or fitness strap and by 2020, the wearable tech market is projected[2] to be worth around 30 billion dollars (USD).
But with the new, more complex features, Apple might need more juice to power up its wearable tech.
The move would give Google the potential to create its own branded smartwatches to compete against Apple, Fitbit, and others in the wearable tech space.
The product profile of this year's WOCEE ranges from wireless devices to wearable tech, robotics to automotive electronics to video, photography, digital imaging to audio, educational innovations to computer hardware and software, sports technology and gaming, and even smart home products, as well as those for health and wellness.
Physical construction work is hard, tiring, and at times dangerous, but can wearable tech that monitors staff health help to minimise work-related injuries and fatalities?