Web farm

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Web farm

(1) A group of computer systems and Web server software that collectively provide the Web page delivery mechanism in a company either for internal use (intranet) and/or for the public Internet. It is a server farm made up of Web servers (HTTP servers). See server farm.

(2) A group of Web servers that are controlled locally, but centrally managed. Each website is administered by its own Webmaster; however, centralized monitoring provides load balancing and fault tolerance. See server farm.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Infoconomy comment: Managing a web server farm can be a time consuming and costly business.
The test configuration simulated in the ZD Labs test created traffic volumes equivalent to more than 1.7 billion transactions per day, which exceeds levels currently experienced by moderately sized Web server farms and provides today's Web sites with more than enough headroom to accommodate tomorrow's growth.
The new device would also allow 'power proportional computing.' For example, Web server farms, such as those used by Google, consume an enormous amount of power - even when there are low levels of user activity - in part because the server farms can't turn off the power without affecting their main memory.
The Internet Cloud is generated and maintained by facilities called data centers or web server farms. These rustic-sounding server farms (think of a geek with a hayfork?), like Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs), are tucked--if something that covers dozens or even hundreds of acres can be said to be "tucked"--here and there across the country, downplayed if not concealed in generic buildings.
Examples include IP-intensive switching applications, telephony and streaming media applications, Web server farms, and compute intensive environments.