wedging


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Idioms.

wedging

[′wej·iŋ]
(engineering)
A method used in quarrying to obtain large, regular blocks of building stones; a row of holes is drilled, either by hand or by pneumatic drills, close to each other so that a longitudinal crevice is formed into which a gently sloping steel wedge is driven, and the block of stone can be detached without shattering.
The act of changing the course of a borehole by using a deflecting wedge.
The lodging of two or more wedge-shaped pieces of core inside a core barrel, and therefore blocking it.
The material, moss, or wood used to render the shaft lining tight.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wedging and misalignment create different forces and wear patterns on the screw.
When wedging or screw misalignment occurs, the high compressive forces on the flight squeeze out any polymer that normally lubricates the two surfaces.
While wedging results in a "burr" on the trailing side of the flight (see Fig.