welfare

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welfare

1. 
a. financial and other assistance given to people in need
b. (as modifier): welfare services
2. plans or work to better the social or economic conditions of various underprivileged groups
3. the welfare Informal chiefly Brit the public agencies involved with giving such assistance
4. on welfare Chiefly US and Canadian in receipt of financial aid from a government agency or other source
References in periodicals archive ?
In particular I would like to thank you for helping to spread the word about the charity and supporting us in our welfare work. Thank you for your support, we could not do it without you."
To develop public welfare work, the church must work harder on many fronts, such as self-construction.
Money raised through the Poppy Appeal goes directly to The Royal British Legion's welfare work providing through life care to anyone who is currently serving in the British Armed Forces, who has previously served, and their families.
The Poppy Appeal is recognised throughout the UK as the fundraising appeal to support the ongoing welfare work.
The New Miracle Workers: Overcoming Contemporary Challenges in Child Welfare Work. Washington, DC: CWLA Press, 2004.
A TIPPERARY soldier has been awarded a major international honour for his welfare work helping ex servicemen and women.
This book's diverse research demonstrates the value of careful historical analysis in revising understanding of the Social Gospel movement by documenting its influence in the social welfare work of women, Canadians, Catholics and African Americans from the late nineteenth to the close of the twentieth century.
This short book is a welcome addition to the too-sparse literature on the social welfare work of women religious in Australia, which has often been overshadowed by their significant role in education.
The first decade of this century saw an unprecedented merger movement, the appearance of giant factories, the spread of labor legislation and other progressive political reforms, and the growth of welfare work in large and aggressively managed firms.
Shirley Tillotson, " `When our membership awakens': Welfare Work and Canadian Union Activism, 1950-1965," Labour/Le Travail, 40 (Fall 1997), 137-69.
Many of the most daunting roadblocks to fair welfare work are not entrenched in the economy but inked in the law books.
The year 1913 saw the publication of a pioneering report by the Bureau of Labor Statisics titled Employers' Welfare Work, a catchall phrase used in that era to cover almost any company policy that went beyond wage payments to benefit workers.[1] This report consisted of short descriptive case studies intended to provide a guide to good employer practice.