western larch


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western larch

A moderately strong, heavy softwood of the western US with coarse-textured reddish brown wood; used in general building construction, as timbers and flooring.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The western larch planted in this project are tong-standing trees that tend to have cavities, providing excellent habitat for wildlife.
Western larch shingles also tended to be free of fungal attack except for the nontreated controls.
This particular squirrel favored Western Larch over Douglas-fir for caching harvested mushrooms during the period we made our observations.
it is available from western larch wood in yields of 10 to 20%.
The truckloads sampled included only pure sorted loads, consisting of five species sorts common to the Intermountain West: (1) Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and western larch (Larix occidentallis); (2) grand fir (Abies grandis), western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla), and sub-alpine fir (Abies grandis); (3) lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa); and (4) western redcedar (Thuja plicata).
As harvesting shifts toward more second-growth forests, hard questions are increasingly asked about the naturally durable heartwood species, including: "Is the lumber we are buying now as durable as the material we used to get?" "What is the effect on service life of sapwood faces on lumber?" "Can I substitute western larch or tamarack for western red cedar?" And in new markets: "Is white cedar or yellow cedar really as durable as western red cedar?" There are plenty of textbook references and anecdotal evidence but little or no hard data on which to base answers to such questions.
That's where ponderosa pine and western larch grow and where more people live.
Three larch species can be found in North America: alpine larch (Larix lyallii), distributed primarily at high elevations in western Canada; eastern larch (Larix laricina), distributed in boggy areas of the northern forests of eastern North America; and western larch (Larix occidentalis), distributed in the American West.
Ponderosa pine, Western Larch, Whitebark pine, and Aspen would be planted to return those species to large areas of their native ranges.
Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) present a high incompatibility; whereas western larch (Larix occidentalis) is strongly incompatible.
In this study, the kraft pulping characteristics, fiber properties, and handsheet properties of small-diameter trees and tops from three eastern Washington wood species (lodgepole pine, Douglas-fir, and western larch) were determined.
Because of extended drought, planting of 100,000 western larch, ponderosa pine, Douglas-fir, Englemann spruce, and blister-rust-resistant white pine was delayed until November 7.

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