wet hole

wet hole

[′wet ‚hōl]
(engineering)
A borehole that traverses a water-bearing formation from which the flow of water is great enough to keep the hole almost full of water.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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I was sure every airplane in the world was being vectored right at me to get through that smooth but wet hole I had just traversed.
Not a nasty, dirty, wet hole, filled with the ends of worms and an oozy smell, nor yet a dry, bare, sandy hole with nothing in it to sit down on or to eat: it was a hobbit-hole, and that means comfort.
But last night, the 19-year-old said: "They left my mother down there in a dark, wet hole for six hours and I can never forgive them for that.
"The shrapnel had gone down into the other's brain and he died in that stinking, wet hole with an unfinished letter to his mom in his top pocket, curled like he was asleep.
"Between the attacks the men would lay in their wet holes and pray for relief.
For wet holes this graph can also be used, with slight adjustments during test blasting.
you love filling my holes little wet holes because my ears are
Water will be directed to places within the field where it will lie, creating wet holes and the risk of even greater compaction next year."