wetting phase

wetting phase

[′wed·iŋ ‚fāz]
(petroleum engineering)
In a two-phase oil reservoir system (oil and water), one phase (water) will wet the pore surfaces of the reservoir formation, the other (oil) will not.
References in periodicals archive ?
The total computation domain (Figure 1) is comprised of wetting phase (WP) and nonwetting phase (NWP) reservoirs denoted by [[OMEGA].sub.w,res] and [[OMEGA].sub.n,res], respectively, as well as the porous computational unit cell [[OMEGA].sub.cuc].
Studies [38,43] indicated that observed rate dependency of wetting phase experiment results at high IFT was reproduced by simulations with constant relative permeability (Kr) and capillary pressure (Pc), while observed rate effects of wetting phase in experiments were at low IFT systems and were interpreted as a result of rate dependency in the Kr function.
The wetting phase allows the clay to disperse and during the drying phase the surface tension forces the sand and clay into intimate contact, which results in lowering the water repellency by improving soil structure (Ward 1993).
Denote the wetting phase by a subscript w and the nonwetting phase by n.
where [S.sub.e] is the effective saturation calculated with residual saturations, [lambda] and [p.sub.b] are constants realized from intercept and slope, [lambda] means pore size distribution, [p.sub.b] is interpreted as maximum capillary pressure, the [p.sub.c] is the capillary pressure which represents pressure difference between wetting phase pressure and nonwetting phase pressure.
The capillary pressure [P.sub.C] has been assumed to depend only on the saturation of the wetting phase (water); this capillary pressure can also depend on the surface tension, porosity, permeability, and the contact angle with the rock surface of the wetting phase which in turn depends on the temperature and fluid composition; with such assumption on capillary pressure the parameters can also be included to study its effect in future.
Wetting Phase (in water) The relationships between the percent weight change and time for coated specimens in water and 15% NaCl solution are shown in Figures 2, 3, 4 and 5 respectively.
2 holds for identical viscosity ratios with increase in wetting phase viscosity from 1 to 15 cp, but does not hold if the non-wetting phase is a gas.
Other parameters that were established for the water insertion procedure were the number of hours that water was to be inserted into the assemblies each day and the number of days for which wetting took place during the wetting phase of the experiment.
In the displacement process, the [tau] value of the wetting phase gradually decreased and that of the nonwetting phase gradually increased for both plugs, as presented in Table 2 and Figure 7.