wetware


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wetware

(jargon)
/wet'weir/ (Probably from the novels of Rudy Rucker, or maybe Stanislav Lem) The human nervous system, as opposed to electronic computer hardware or software. "Wetware has 7 plus or minus 2 temporary registers." Also, human beings (programmers, operators, administrators) attached to a computer system, as opposed to the system's hardware or software.

See liveware, meatware.

This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

wetware

A biological system. It typically refers to the human brain and nervous system. See liveware, grayware and wares.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(29) This unconscious quick cognition ability stems from the development of sophisticated wetware. On average, the cognitive brain's ability to hold information is limited to about seven items (plus or minus two); it processes about 40 bits of information per second.
Pragmatic Thinking and Learning: Refactor Your Wetware. Raleigh: Pragmatic Bookshelf.
Por su parte, ese conocimiento tacito es el que denominan wetware en referencia al 'computador humedo' que es el cerebro humano, mientras que llaman software al conocimiento que esta codificado fuera del cerebro humano en medios fisicos de almacenamiento (Conceicao et al., 1998).
"Whether the technology is tractors, assembly lines, or spreadsheets, the first-order goal is to substitute mechanical power for human musculature, machine-consistency for human handiwork, and digital calculation for slow and error-prone 'wetware,'" he writes.
Winn Schwartau, author of Information Warfare and recognized IW theorist, describes the information age as "computers everywhere." (3) The ultimate fact of the information age is the proliferation of IT, which "incorporates information systems and resources (hardware, software, and wetware) used by military and civilian decisionmakers to send, receive, control, and manipulate information necessary to enable 21st-century decisionmaking." (4) Additionally, the development of IT allows sharing of information in near real time, at an exponential rate, anonymously and securely.
It is not a piece of hardware, a mechanical contraption or electronic gadget, but something abstract that can be concretely executed or implemented by such hardware--and according to the machine-state functionalist also by the so-called wetware of the brain.
The Internet has been used as an open platform: tuitions on how to assemble the BioBrick parts could then be instantly accessed at https://www.neb.com/products/E0546BioBrick-Assembly-Kit; wikis such as Open Wetware (http://openwetware.org/wiki/ Main_Page) allowed to share open protocols; a number of online registries provide access to part collections (17); and user-friendly software platforms such as GeneDesigner have been developed to facilitate the design of sequences.
Identification of an energy field manifesting information characteristics in multiple bandwidths of radiant energy associated with biological systems would support the feasibility that, in principle, major components of consciousness might eventually be stored, maintained, and manipulated using hardware (e.g., fiber optics and silicon, perhaps) instead of wetware (biological tissue).
Neubauer, enriching the scheme to the concept of wetware, when considering the subjectivity and autonomy in conjunction with mechanistic conception.
It's really not so strange an algorithm should outwit our human wetware at board games.
Following Boomen and colleagues (2009), who wished to challenge the supposed immateriality of the digital, the digital material highlights various new media phenomena as "material assemblages of hardware, software, and wetware...