wharfie

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wharfie

Austral and NZ a wharf labourer; docker
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(67) For a history of the WWF, see Margo Beasley, Wharfies: The History of the Waterside Worker's Federation, Sydney: Halstead Press, 1996.
(1996) Wharfies: A History of the Waterside Workers' Federation of Australia.
A tradition of union militancy meant that wharfies valued the power of organised labour and the strike weapon to gain and maintain working conditions.
They are people from all walks of life--a dairy-farmer, a former war-time air crew staff, a police Commissioner, Labor MPs (such as Kim Beazley, Snr), a prime ministerial adviser on foreign affairs (Allan Griffith), a trade union leader for the wharfies (Jim Beggs), a Laotian refugee, an Aboriginal community worker (Reg Blow)--not to mention their wives of similarly strong personality and dedication.
At Brisbane aircraft to be unloaded were ripped apart by wharfies in revenge for American military police inspecting their lunch-kits for stolen cigarettes.
Beasley, Wharfies: The History of the Waterside Workers Federation (Sydney 1996); M.
During the waterfront dispute in 1998, Gawanali and Neowarra sent letters of support to the striking wharfies. He supported the Wave Hill walk-off, believing that this signalled the way forward for Aboriginal people of the North.
They rounded up the wharfies (longshoremen) and expelled them from the docks.
Struggles as seemingly disparate as the dockers and wharfies and United Parcel Service workers, joined by their counterparts at other ends of the transportation network, or the various worldwide and coordinated struggles against the MAI or ownership of genes; or the rebellions that toppled Suharto, or in Chiapas, or Los Angeles, 1992, are expressions of this new class flexing its muscles.
"If you lose this fight," Swedish union leader Erland Lindkvist told Sydney's wharfies, "they will move [on] to other countries in Europe and the United States." Last year, the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and its supporters chased a ship carrying cargo from Liverpool up the U.S.
On day one American longshoremen on both coasts and Australian wharfies brought their countries' ports to a standstill.
For example, Terry Adams of the Wellington Seamen's Union, wrote, 'if this was violence, then I must admit I've seen worse on a wharfies' picnic day'.