whelk


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whelk,

large marine gastropodgastropod,
member of the class Gastropoda, the largest and most successful class of mollusks (phylum Mollusca), containing over 35,000 living species and 15,000 fossil forms.
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 snail found in temperate waters. The whelk is sometimes eaten, but when food is plentiful, fishermen frequently use it for bait. Whelks are scavengers and carnivores, equipped with an extensible proboscis, tipped with a filelike radula, with which they bore holes through the shells of crabs and lobsters, and a large, muscular foot with which they hold their victims. The thick-lipped, spiral shell has an uneven surface with many protuberances. The knobbed whelk, the largest species, ranging up to 16 in. (40.6 cm), and the channeled whelk, slightly smaller, are both found south of Cape Cod, Mass. In summer the strings of pale, disk-shaped egg cases are common along the shore. The whelk is sometimes mistakenly called conchconch
, common name for certain marine gastropod mollusks having a heavy, spiral shell, the whorls of which overlap each other. In conchs the characteristic gastropod foot is reduced in size and the operculum, a horny plate located on the foot and used to seal the shell opening
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. Whelks are classified in the phylum MolluscaMollusca
, taxonomic name for the one of the largest phyla of invertebrate animals (Arthropoda is the largest) comprising more than 50,000 living mollusk species and about 35,000 fossil species dating back to the Cambrian period.
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, class Gastropoda, order Neogastropoda.

whelk

[welk]
(invertebrate zoology)
A gastropod mollusk belonging to the order Neogastropoda; species are carnivorous but also scavenge.

whelk

1
any carnivorous marine gastropod mollusc of the family Buccinidae, of coastal waters and intertidal regions, having a strong snail-like shell

whelk

2
a raised lesion on the skin; wheal
References in periodicals archive ?
The mass of the left valve of the oysters and the whole shell of the whelks was measured using an electronic balance (Precisa).
Data were averaged across individuals for each species of whelk, and the standard errors (SE) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated.
The current EU-wide minimum size a whelk must be before it is landed is 45mm (1.8 inches) but in England the edible sea snails mature when they've grown to between 45mm and 78mm (3.1 inches) depending on where they are.
Validation and methods of use for statoliths in the commercially important whelk Buccinum undatum have recently been published (Hollyman et al.
Here, we performed a field investigation to establish the relative roles of dissolved and contact cues in predation by whelks (Acanthinucella spirata) on barnacles (Balanus glandula), their preferred prey.
Most whelk research has been conducted on knobbed whelk, and minimal research has been done on channeled whelk (Avise et al., 2004; Bruce, 2006; Castagna and Kraeuter, 1994; Eversole et al., 2008; Kraeuter et al., 1989; Power et al.
To use Charlie's own words: 'I had two of them lucky left-handed whelks, which I gave to my two best chums, but I hadn't any to give to the other man.
Remove whelk meat from shell and reserve in liquid,
NORDIC BUSINESS REPORT-31 March 2005-Plans for whelk factory on Froya - report(C)1994-2005 M2 COMMUNICATIONS LTD http://www.m2.com
If such a sorry tale proves anything it is the total irrelevance of this European Quango and the inability of Labour to run a whelk stall, let alone two enormous institutions, one of which is our own city council.
The only plant now operating on the coast, Blanc Sablon Seafoods, processes scallops, whelk, lumpfish roe, stimson clams and sea urchins.