Teiidae

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Teiidae

[′tē·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
The tegus lizards, a diverse family of the suborder Sauria that is especially abundant and widespread in South America.
References in periodicals archive ?
Synopsis of the subspecies of the little striped whiptail lizard Cnemidophorus inornatus Baird.
Key words: cestodes; helminths; nematodes; parasites; racerunners; whiptail lizards; Cnemidophorus sexlineatus.
Reproductive activity of males is extended over a relatively long period as in other tropical (Vitt and Breitenbach, 1993; Ramirez-Bautista et al., 2000; Ramirez-Bautista and Pardo-de la Rosa, 2002) and subtropical whiptail lizards (Vitt and Breitenbach, 1993).
Whiptail lizards of the genus Aspidoscelis (formerly Cnemidophorus; Reeder and others 2002), occur throughout the southern and southwestern United States, with the ranges of some species extending into southeastern Oregon and adjacent Idaho.
2001) and in whiptail lizards (Wennstrom and Crews 1995), letrozole affected sex determination, as did fadrozole in chickens and turkeys (Burke and Henry 1999).
Evidence for specific recognition of the San Esteban whiptail lizard (Cnemidophorus estebanensis).
The taxonomic status of the inornate (unstriped) and ornate (striped) whiptail lizards (Aspidoscelis inornata [Baird]) from Coahuila and Nuevo Leton.
Interspecific dominance and burrow use in the two species of the parthenogenetic whiptail lizard complex Cnemidophorus laredoensis (Teiidae).
However, members of a parthenogeneticstrain of the fly--which scientists developed from virgin flies in 1961--lay about 15 times more eggs than do isolated females from the original bisexual strain, a feat unaffected by the presence of male behavior (in contrast to the whiptail lizard).
Clonal diversity in the parthenogenetic whiptail lizard, Cnemidophorus 'laredoensis' complex (Sauria: Teiidae), as determined by skin transplantation and karyological techniques.
However, infection rate was not significantly influenced by host body size in an investigation of a partenogenetic whiptail lizard (Cnemidophorus nativo) (Menezes et al.