whistler wave

whistler wave

[′wis·lər ‚wāv]
(plasma physics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Ganguli, "Whistler wave propagation and whistler wave antenna radiation resistance measurements," IEEE Trans.
Es'kin, "Whistler wave propagation in a bounded collisional magnetoplasma," Phys.
Zaboronkova, "Whistler wave excitation by a loop antenna in a bounded collisional magnetoplasma," Phys.
Zaboronkova, "Radiation of whistler waves in magnetoactive plasma," Radio Sci., Vol.
Helicons have an exact analogy with a electromagnetic whistler wave which is frequently propagated in the rarefied plasma of the Earth's ionosphere.
The nature of the disturbance suggests that it was carried through the solar wind by a so-called whistler wave, which transmits higher frequences at a faster speed.
It was Robben's turn to feel aggrieved in 82 minutes when he tumbled under a Fernandinho challenge and saw the whistler wave play on again.
The data collected also produced a recording of whistler waves published on (https://soundcloud.com/nasa/whistler-waves2) Soundcloud and researchers believe it's these waves, or the chorus, that are causing the bursts and scattering of the electrons.
Some specific subjects covered include chaotic motion of relativistic electrons driven by Whistler waves, thermodynamic and transport properties of non-ideal complex plasma, and linear coupling of electron cyclotron waves in magnetized plasmas.
There is also a track from radio waves in Earth's own atmosphere that sounds like creatures in a rainforest chirping, a track called "whistler waves" that sounds like the beginning of a Rush song, and radar echoes from the surface of Saturn's moon Titan that could be the sound effects on a video game.