white matter


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Related to white matter: gray matter

white matter

the whitish tissue of the brain and spinal cord, consisting mainly of myelinated nerve fibres
References in periodicals archive ?
As described on the NIH's Mind Your Risks website, several studies have suggested that people who have hypertension have a greater chance of accumulating white matter lesions and also of experiencing cognitive disorders and dementia later in life.
These observations were tested in a gold standard randomized clinical trial, called SPRINT Memory and Cognition in Decreased Hypertension (MIND), which examined whether controlling blood pressure levels could prevent or slow white matter lesion progression and aging brain disorders.
While Reneman said the study wasn't designed to determine whether white matter changes in boys taking methylphenidate were good or bad, a U.S.
Moderate-to-severe white matter rarefaction and arteriolosclerosis occurred frequently (46.6 and 47.2 percent, respectively), while infarcts, microinfarcts, and microbleeds did not.
"The differences that we see in the brains of young people with conduct disorder are unique in so much as they are different from the white matter changes that have been reported in other childhood conditions such as autism or ADHD," says Dr Jack Rogers, co-lead author on the study.
The researchers determined that lower fitness levels were associated with weaker white matter, which in turn correlated with lower brain function.
Leukoencephalopathy with vanishing white matter (VWM; MIM #603896) is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by childhood ataxia, spasticity, and variable optic atrophy.
Medical testing has revealed the embassy workers developed changes to the white matter tracts that let different parts of the brain communicate, several U.S.
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed diffuse T2/fluid-attenuated inversion recovery hyperintense white matter lesions involving the right frontal, parietal and temporal lobes (Figure 1).
In support of postmortem neuropathological studies showing degeneration of white matter, MRI studies have shown a specific vulnerability of white matter to chronic alcohol exposure.