wilting point


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wilting point

[′wilt·iŋ ‚pȯint]
(botany)
A condition in which a plant begins to use water from its own tissues for transpiration because soil water has been exhausted.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
coarse sand, fine sand and fine sandy loam) have lower water contents at wilting point than soils with greater clay contents (e.g.
This 2008 image is part of "Wilting Point," a solo show by William Daniels opening on January 25 in Paris at Pavillon Carre de Baudouin.
Duplicate undisturbed soil core samples in 100 cc Kopecky rings with height and diameter dimensions of 5 cm were used to determine soil moisture at field capacity (FC) and moisture content at wilting point (WP) using a pressure plate apparatus.
Water balance, upper limit (field capacity) and lower limit (permanent wilting point), irrigation, water availability factor (f) (30%) and soil water content for the treatment with irrigation depth of 100% are shown in Figure 2.
Field capacity and permanent wilting point aside, Decker checks the forecast frequently for changes in weather.
Reduction in average depth of contour line of field capacity after irrigation and reduction in average depth of contour line of permanent wilting point before irrigation indicates a decline in the influence of water stress on the cultivated plants.
Soil water contents at the suctions of field capacity (FC) (1/3 atm.) and permanent wilting point (PWP) (15 atm.) were determined in the laboratory by ceramic plates following the procedures by Klute [17].
In other years, soil water reserve on irrigation depth decreased below wilting point.
Soil depth EC Organic matter % Bulk density Wilting point Cm (g/[[cm.sup.3]) WP% 0-20 1.43 1.1 1.42 9.8 20-40 1.71 1 1.42 9.6 40-60 1.81 0.8 1.42 9.5 60-80 2.76 0.8 1.42 9.45 Table 2: Summary results of variance analysis.
Generally, two hydrolimits are considered: field capacity (FC) and permanent wilting point (PWP).
There have been attempts to characterise the soil moisture constants, field capacity, and wilting point but fewer to characterise the retention behaviour of soils and with very limited data points (Abrol et al.
At this stage, the plant is said to be at its wilting point. The difference between soil moisture at field capacity and the wilting point is called the available water (Figure 9-7).