wind stress

wind stress

[′win ‚stres]
(meteorology)
The drag or tangential force per unit area exerted on the surface of the earth by the adjacent layer of moving air.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr David Gwyther from the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies at the University of Tasmania, and a contributor to the new research, said the study combined satellite images of the ice sheet, wind stress data, and oceanography observations, to determine the chain of events that bring warm water to the Totten.
Marc (2001) and Tsimplis (1995) found that the best correlation in coastal areas is between sea level and wind stress. In shallow tropical coastal areas, like the VRSNP, a high correlation is expected between wind stress and sea level.
Principal component analysis was used to define the alongshore and cross-shore components of the wind stress for each MB.
HFFB procedure defines the global wind stress action on the building as the summation of the static and dynamic contributions [45-48].
The advantage of using drogues or sails is that the slippage between the drifter and current motion due to wind stress is reduced.
In the theoretical study, we will need to develop a new theory in which the wind effects such as the wind stress and the wind-induced surface current are considered.
Very little is known about the influence of the wind stress field over the upper ocean volume transport in the South Brazil Bight (SBB) and the interannual variability associated with them.
Figure 7 shows the surge level fluctuations and the wind stress vector in the Bohai Sea at typical time during the storm surge.
When upwelling only occurs on the northeast shore at a time t = T (T is duration of the northeasterly wind), the sum of absolute values of surface displacement and interfacial displacement should simply be equal to the thickness of the upper layer ([absolute value of [[zeta].sub.total](-L/2, T)] + [[zeta]'.sub.total](-L/2, T) = h), and a wind stress can be gotten.
where [[tau].sub.a] is wind stress and P is the two-dimensional strength of the ice sheet, which depends on the thickness and length scale.